Why Do Weed Seeds Give You A Headache

Everyone seems to be talking about the possible health applications of marijuana and products made from it, like CBD oil. Find out what we really know about the way this drug affects your body and brain. Why does your head hurt when you smoke marijuana? Isn't weed supposed to help you get rid of headaches – not cause them? Let's bust this conundrum. 1.9m members in the trees community. The go-to subreddit for anything and everything cannabis. From MMJ to munchies, from nugs to news, and …

How Marijuana Affects Your Body

Let’s be honest: This is why most people use marijuana. THC is what causes the high. When you smoke marijuana, THC goes from your lungs to your bloodstream and then makes its way to your brain. There it connects to parts of certain cells called receptors. That’s what gives you those pleasant feelings. You can also get marijuana in things like cookies, gummies, and brownies. These are called edibles. They get into your blood through your digestive system.

Brain

You might find it harder to focus, learn, and remember things when you use marijuana. This short-term effect can last up to 24 hours after you stop smoking. Long-term use, especially in your teens, may have more permanent effects. Imaging tests that take pictures of the brain show fewer connections in areas linked to alertness, learning, and memory. Tests show lower IQ scores in some people.

Lungs

Marijuana smoke can inflame your lungs. If you’re a regular user, you could have the same breathing problems as a cigarette smoker. That means a cough, sometimes long lasting, or chronic. It might produce colored mucus, or phlegm. You could also be more likely to get lung infections. Inflamed lung tissue is part of the reason, but THC also seems to affect the way some people’s immune systems work.

Heart

Your normal heart rate of 50 to 70 beats per minute can rise by 20 to 50 beats or more for up to 3 hours after you use marijuana. Scientists think that this, along with tar and other chemicals in the drug, may raise your chance of a heart attack or stroke. The risk could go up further if you’re older or you already have heart problems.

Mental Health

Anxiety and paranoia are common complaints among marijuana users. Clinical anxiety and depression are also more likely, but scientists aren’t yet sure exactly why. The drug can make symptoms of more serious mental illness like psychosis and schizophrenia worse. It’s also linked to a higher likelihood of substance abuse. These effects could be worse if your genes make you more likely to get a mental illness or an addiction.

Appetite

Regular marijuana users often refer to this as the munchies. Some reports suggest this increased appetite might help you gain weight lost to illnesses like AIDS or cancer, or because of treatment for those diseases. Scientists are still studying when and if the treatment works or if it’s safe.

Stomach

By itself, THC (marijuana’s active ingredient) seems to ease nausea, especially if your symptoms are from chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Some people say the stomach-settling effects work better when you use marijuana instead of THC alone. This may be because other chemicals enhance the effects of THC. But long-term marijuana use can have the opposite effect and cause more vomiting. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome can occur in regular users and leads to frequent vomiting.

Some evidence suggests that marijuana, or chemicals in it, can lower the eye pressure that’s a main symptom of glaucoma. The problem is the effect only lasts 3 to 4 hours. To keep it low, you’d have to get the drug into your bloodstream 6-8 times a day. Doctors have yet to come up with a form of the drug that’s safe to use as a glaucoma treatment. And though marijuana does seem to lower eye pressure, it also might reduce the blood supply to your eye, which could make glaucoma worse.

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Chronic Pain

Both marijuana and a pill version of THC called dronabinol seem to help relieve pain by attaching to parts of brain cells called cannabinoid receptors. Some studies suggest CBD oil could ease pain from arthritis, nerve damage (neuropathy), and muscle spasms, among other causes. Scientists continue to study how and when and if this works in people.

Multiple Sclerosis

A version of THC that you spray up your nose called nabiximols is available in Canada, the U.K., and other countries. It seems to help calm muscle spasms, lessen nerve pain, and improve sleep for many people with multiple sclerosis. It may also help with other illnesses, like cancer. The FDA is working to test the drug for use in the U.S.

Inflammation

Though smoking marijuana can inflame your lungs, substances called cannabinoids seem to lessen the swelling in certain other tissues. Cannabidiol may be a good choice because it doesn’t cause the same high as THC. In animal tests, it shows some promise in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and conditions that inflame the digestive tract, like ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.

Seizures

There’s good evidence that marijuana, or drugs made from it, may help lessen seizures in some people with epilepsy. The FDA has even approved a drug made with cannabidiol for that purpose (Epidiolex). But the agency only recommends it for two rare forms of childhood epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome.

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IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

1) Science Source

British National Health Service: “Cannabis: the facts.”

CDC: “Marijuana and Public Health.”

Colorado Department of Public Health: “FAQ — Health Effects of Marijuana.”

Epilepsy Currents: “Cannabidiol: Promise and Pitfalls.”

European Journal of Pain: “Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis.”

Glaucoma Research Foundation: “Should You Be Smoking Marijuana To Treat Your Glaucoma?”

Government of Canada Department of Public Health: “Health effects of cannabis.”

Journal of Epilepsy Research: “Cannabinoids in the Treatment of Epilepsy: Hard Evidence at Last?”

Journal of Experimental Medicine: “Cannabinoids suppress inflammatory and neuropathic pain by targeting α3 glycine receptors.”

National Cancer Institute: “Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ®)–Health Professional Version.”

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “Marijuana,” “What are marijuana’s effects on lung health?”

“What are marijuana’s long-term effects on the brain?” “What is marijuana?”

Nemours Foundation: “Marijuana.”

New England Journal of Medicine: “Adverse Health Effects of Marijuana Use.”

FDA: “FDA approves first drug comprised of an active ingredient derived from marijuana to treat rare, severe forms of epilepsy.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Casarella, MD on December 17, 2021

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

Why Does Your Head Hurt After You Smoke Weed?

We’ve likely all heard of some of the side effects that are possible when smoking marijuana. What is less talked about, however, are some of the milder symptoms that occur from periodic cannabis consumption.

While there is minimal evidence currently available on the matter, many cannabis users report headaches after smoking weed. Is it possible for the two to be connected in a physiological sense?

In this article, we take a look at the facts in order to try and answer this question. Can cannabis cause headaches, or are other factors at play? Here is all you need to know and more.

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The Weed Hangover

If you have ever smoked a little more than you should have, you will probably understand exactly what we mean by the term ‘weed hangover.’ For those who are less in the know, let us explain.

Most of us have been there; a quiet night in with a few drinks turns into an over-indulgent party full of fun and far too much alcohol. You wake up the next day feeling miserable, with a terrible headache after smoking weed and an intense nausea from the alcohol.

Sound familiar? Well, there are many cannabis users out there that claim marijuana can do the same thing in terms of resulting in a wicked headache.
While not scientifically proven, many marijuana enthusiasts report telltale symptoms of a hangover the day after a heavy smoking session. And yes – along with things like fatigue, dry eyes, brain fog, and nausea, severe headaches are a common side effect that one might experience after heavy use.

In a general sense, we now know from years of research that cannabis is a non-toxic plant. Unlike alcohol, which can be extremely dangerous (and even lethal in high doses), there has never been a reported case of overdose or death by consuming cannabis.

Thus, even if these mythical weed hangovers were a real physiological thing, they would not compare in intensity to the hangover that results from drinking too much alcohol. Furthermore, even if we could objectively define the symptoms that result from a weed hangover, the effects would likely be greatly diluted in comparison to the physiological effects that excess alcohol has on the body.

But, is it possible that weed does, in fact, cause a migraine? Or, to a less severe extent, does it make physiological sense to get a headache after weed? Let’s dig a little deeper.

Weed Headaches: The Myth Behind Cannabis and Dehydration

It’s well-known that one of the critical causes of headaches is dehydration. But is dehydration a result of cannabis?

The evidence on cannabis usage and dehydration is inconclusive and warrants further study. Many people attribute dry mouth, or ‘cotton mouth’ to dehydration, but this is inaccurate. Studies have shown that actually, cottonmouth has to do with lack of saliva and the way that cannabis interacts with the body – namely the CB1 and CB2 receptors of the endocannabinoid system.

With that in mind, what else is there to explore when it comes to marijuana and headaches (informally known as a weed headache)?

The Facts About Cannabis and Headaches

Among the misinformed claims that cannabis can bring about a killer headache, are the many studies done on marijuana as an effective treatment for headaches and migraines.

A study published as recently as 2016 showed that across 121 adult migraine sufferers, the occurrence of migraines was more than halved after the consumption of cannabis. In another study from 2017, authors observed that patients reported fewer migraines per month after cannabis use.

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Here are some of the published statistics from the studies:

  • The average number of migraines reduced from 10.4 per month to 4.6
  • Approximately 85% of the participants reported having fewer migraines per month using marijuana
  • Only 12% of the 121 participants stated they saw no change in the frequency of their migraines

Researchers from the 2016 publication in Pharmacotherapy (see link above) remarked that “most patients used more than one form of marijuana, and used it daily for [the] prevention of migraine headache.” They also concluded that “inhaled forms of marijuana were commonly used for acute migraine treatment, and were reported to abort migraine headache.”

What Can You Do to Combat a Headache Caused by Weed?

While there is no evidence for the argument that cannabis itself brings about headaches, it is possible that other factors related to smoking marijuana can contribute. Whether you are out in the sunshine enjoying cannabis with your friends or having a heavy smoking session inside, there are a few aspects to consider if you suffer from “after weed” headaches.

If you are going to be smoking outside enjoying the summer, remember to drink plenty of water before, during, and after smoking. While there may not be evidence of cannabis causing headaches, there is plenty of scientific evidence for the sun causing dehydration, which we know brings on headaches. Keeping on top of your fluid intake and giving yourself breaks in the shade should help to combat those pesky brain pains.

The same rule is applicable if you are getting high indoors, as it can be so easy to forget to drink! Keeping water next to you will serve as a visual reminder for those occasions where you are too intoxicated to otherwise remember to hydrate.

There are of course a few other tips and tricks, such as avoiding salty foods (which may be easier said than done once the munchies kick in!), and ensuring that you don’t overdo it.

In any case, it should be fairly clear by now that cannabis itself is not the main reason for those ‘weed hangover’ symptoms – headaches included.

Final Thoughts on Marijuana and Headaches

To summarize, the answer to the question of “why does my head hurt when I smoke weed” doesn’t necessarily involve cannabis. Headaches can occur as the result of a number of different things, but too much cannabis is not likely one of them.

Using common sense when enjoying marijuana will usually be enough to see off any headaches. Perhaps a particular strain doesn’t agree with you, or maybe you simply haven’t had enough to drink that day.

What we do know is that marijuana does not cause dehydration. Furthermore, it is not conclusive that a headache after weed is caused by the cannabis itself. So for those who are concerned about headaches after smoking a joint, perhaps consider what other factors might be at play!

Is it bullshit: smoking seeds/stems causes a headache?

Smoking any dense moist plant matter can cause a lot of carbon monoxide and other gases which could cause a headache. Can happen from regular weed too.

Seems like poopy weed will do that to ya.. I ised to live in VA Beach and always get awesome reefer and never had problems. When I moved to Iowa I couldn’t really find quality bud, and after a while of smoking that stepped on ass grass I would get headaches, coughs and chest infections with massive amounts of mucous. When I moved from there and started getting the nicest greenery from Denver and Vegas and I haven’t experienced headaches or coughs since.