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How to Grow Satsumas From Seeds

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With their leathery leaves and sweet fruit, satsumas (Citrus reticulata) serve a dual role in landscaping as both an edible crop and ornamental shrub or tree. They are sensitive to hard frost and will only grow outdoors within U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8B to 12, where they work equally well in pots or in the garden. Satsumas grow effortlessly from seed, which germinate quickly under warm conditions. The seeds don’t require stratification or special pretreatment to successfully sprout, although they must be sown while very fresh because they rapidly lose viability once they dry out.

Collect seed from a ripe, unblemished satsuma by removing the peel and splitting the fruit in half. Pick out the pointed, pale brown seeds from the pithy white center of the fruit. Avoid seeds with black discolorations or other signs of damage.

Wrap the satsuma seeds in a moist paper towel while preparing containers. Fill 6-inch plastic pots with commercially prepared citrus potting mix or a homemade mixture of equal parts milled peat, sterile loam and medium-grit sand.

Add water to the growing mixture before sowing the satsuma seeds. Water to a 3-inch depth. Poke a 1/4-inch-deep hole in the center of the potting mix. Place the seed inside and cover it with soil. Gently firm the soil.

Place the pots indoors near a south-facing window with very bright, indirect light. Arrange the pots on a germination mat. Set the temperature to between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Cover the pots with a sheet of plastic wrap or with a propagation dome.

Check the moisture level in the potting mix every day. Water to a 2-inch depth if the soil feels barely moist just beneath the surface. Add the water slowly to avoid dislodging or disrupting the satsuma seed.

Watch for germination in 30 to 60 days. Turn off the germination mat once the seeds sprout. Remove the plastic wrap or propagation dome when the seedlings are almost tall enough to touch it.

Move the satsuma seedlings into an insulated, lightly shaded cold frame. Open the cold frame for an increasing length of time each day to acclimate the seedlings to normal outdoor temperatures and humidity.

Move the satsumas to a sheltered area outdoors where they will receive morning and late afternoon sun, and midday shade. Provide an inch of water every five to seven days, or whenever the potting mix dries out in the top inch.

Transplant the satsumas into a permanent pot or bed in autumn as they enter dormancy. Grow them in full sun with acidic, fast-draining soil. Choose a sheltered site if growing them in an area where spring frosts are common.

How to Grow Satsumas From Seeds. With their leathery leaves and sweet fruit, satsumas (Citrus reticulata) serve a dual role in landscaping as both an edible crop and ornamental shrub or tree. They are sensitive to hard frost and will only grow outdoors within U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8B to …

OWARI SATSUMA MANDARIN

Product Description:

Simply irresistable! The palm-sized, succulent, juicy Owari Satsuma practically peel themselves. We chose this variety for its early ripening and cold hardiness. Planted outdoors, it can tolerate temperatures as low as 28°F. It’s also right at home in a container, maturing to a height of 3–5 feet.

Weather permitting, citrus plants ship November through June. Not available to AK, AZ, FL, HI, TX, US Territories, or Canada.

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Customer Reviews

Plant Spacing 6–10′
Plant height 3–6′
Hardiness Zone 9
Bearing Age 1–2 years
Ripening Time Year-round
Pollinator Required No

Our citrus trees are 2-3 years old, well-developed and branched with large, healthy root systems. Their trunk diameter ranges 1/2-3/4 inches, above-ground height is over 2 feet, and foliage canopy more than 1 foot in diameter. At this stage of development, they are mature enough to produce fruit. We have selected these special varieties for their vigor, beauty, productivity, and practical utility. Grow in full sun outdoors during warm months. In areas with cold winters, bring indoors and locate in a south facing, sunny window during frosty months. All of our citrus are well suited for cultivation indoors as houseplants. Plants are shipped in 3 gallon pots.

Initial Instructions
Water thoroughly when soil is dry — test soil moisture with your finger or soil moisture meter. Do not over water (water too frequently or allow the plants to stand in water)! Use citrus fertilizer during the growing season, and less in winter months when days are shorter.

Cultivation
Make sure the soil around the roots stays evenly moist for several weeks after planting. During the first growing season don’t let the soil dry out. Periodic deep waterings during the growing season will help your tree grow strong and be less susceptible to drought. Be careful to keep the soil from becoming soggy. A layer of mulch around the trunk of the tree will protect the roots, suppress competitive weeds and conserve water. Avoid piling the mulch up against the base of the plant; leave an inch or so of space around the trunk clear of mulch. To encourage the tree to become established, remove any blossoms that may appear during the first season. During the first dormant season, select 3 strong limbs that are between 2-4 feet off the ground, and remove all but these branches. This will be the foundation framework for the tree. To prune during subsequent dormant seasons, cut damaged, weak or dead limbs, and shape tree as needed.

Size at Maturity
3-6 feet tall when container grown. 6-15 feet tall in the ground. However, trees can be pruned to any shape or height.

Pollination
Our citrus is self-fertile, but will require hand-pollination when it is indoors. Hand pollinate by moving pollen from flower to flower with a small, soft paintbrush or cotton swab.

Pests & Diseases
Outdoors citrus is not bothered by pests or diseases; indoors watch for mites and aphids. Treat with Pyrethrin or Neem oil.

Soil Type
Well drained, acidic.

Light Requirements
Full sun to part shade, or a sunny window indoors.

Bloom Time
Year-round

Yield
Several dozen fruit per year.

Simply irresistable! The palm-sized, succulent, juicy Owari Satsuma practically peel themselves. We chose this variety for its early ripening and cold hardiness. Planted outdoors, it can tolerate temperatures as low as 28°F. It's also right at home in a container, maturing to a height of 3–5 feet.Weather permitting, ci