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Walking With El Salvador

Random thoughts and stories about sharing friendships and experiences in El Salvador (formerly known as Linda’s El Salvador Blog)

The Morro Tree

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Cihuatán is an archeological site which lies just north of Aguilares. Amidst the Mayan ruins, which are definitely worth seeing, you will also find some of the local flora and fauna of the area. This area north of Guazapa has become cattle country, and, according to the locals, some of the wealthy cattle producers have their eye on this property. The security guards and barbed wire fences do a pretty good job of keeping cows off of the site, but nothing can keep the goats from enjoying a good run in the field. The wide variety of bird calls, the tinkling of the goat bells, and the low moos in the distance create a peaceful atmosphere in which to enjoy the ruins and have a relaxing, yet very hot, walk with friends.

One tree that caught my attention was the morro tree.

The strange thing about the morro fruit is that it is connected directly to the trunk and big branches of the tree. The tree looks pretty comical in the dry season, with no leaves and the big green fruits stuck to the trunk. Pablo said that the seeds are used to make horchata. Seriously? You would think that after all of my visits to El Salvador that I would know that Salvadoran horchata is made from morro seeds. You open the fruit, take out the seeds, dry them, grind them up, mix with water, maybe add a pinch of cacao or cinnamon, (although out in the countryside, it is pretty common not to add anything) and you have horchata. What do you do with the fruit itself? Feed it to the cows. Apparently it makes good animal food but not very good people food.

I always wonder about those who first came up with the idea to hack open some weird gourd fruit, save and dry the seeds to make a drink powder, and then taste it. “Hey, it’s good!” or “Great, he didn’t die!” Let’s make it a traditional drink!

Pablo said that he went to one church where they had gigantic morro cups which they used to serve their shuco. Shuco? . another Salvadoran traditional drink, eaten as a meal, and a story for another day.

Walking With El Salvador Random thoughts and stories about sharing friendships and experiences in El Salvador (formerly known as Linda’s El Salvador Blog) The Morro Tree Get link