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latin word for seed

Latin word for seed

From Middle English seed, sede, side, from Old English sēd, sǣd ( “ seed, that which is sown ” ) , from Proto-Germanic *sēdiz ( “ seed ” ) , from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁tis (corresponding to Proto-Germanic *sēaną ( “ to sow ” ) + *-þiz), from *seh₁- ( “ to sow, throw ” ) . Cognate with West Frisian sied ( “ seed ” ) , Dutch zaad ( “ seed ” ) , Low German Saad ( “ seed ” ) , German Saat ( “ sowing; seed ” ) , Icelandic sæði ( “ seed ” ) , Danish sæd ( “ seed ” ) , Swedish säd ( “ seed ” ) , Latin satio ( “ seeding, time of sowing, season ” ) . More at sow .

Alternative forms Edit
  • sede (obsolete)
Noun Edit
  1. ( countable , botany ) A fertilized and ripened ovule, containing an embryonic plant.
  2. ( countable ) Any small seed-like fruit.
Usage notes Edit

The common use of seed differs from the botanical use. The “seeds” of sunflowers are botanically fruits.

Hyponyms Edit
Derived terms Edit
  • allseed
  • go to seed
  • musk seed
  • seedcake
  • seedcase
  • seedcoat
  • seedeater
  • seeder
  • seed fern
  • seed leaf
  • seedling
  • seedly
  • seed money
  • seed phrase
  • seed plant
  • seedpod
  • seed potato
  • seed stitch
  • seed stock
  • seed technology
  • seedtime
  • seed vessel
  • seedy
  • spill one’s seed
Translations Edit
Verb Edit

seed (third-person singular simple present seeds, present participle seeding, simple past and past participle seeded)

  1. ( transitive ) To plant or sow an area with seeds. I seeded my lawn with bluegrass.
  2. ( transitive ) To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
    • 1604, Ben Jonson, The Coronation Triumph a sable mantle seeded with waking eyes
  3. ( transitive ) To start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of. A venture capitalist seeds young companies.The tournament coordinator will seed the starting lineup with the best competitors from the qualifying round.The programmer seeded fresh, uncorrupted data into the database before running unit tests.
  4. ( sports , gaming ) To allocate a seeding to a competitor.
  5. ( Internet , transitive ) To leave (files) available for others to download through peer-to-peer file sharing protocols (e.g. BitTorrent).
  6. ( intransitive ) To be qualified to compete, especially in a quarter-final, semi-final , or final. The tennis player seeded into the quarters.
  7. ( intransitive ) To produce seed.
  8. ( intransitive ) To grow to maturity.
  9. ( slang , vulgar ) To ejaculate inside the penetratee during intercourse, especially in the rectum.
Derived terms Edit
  • overseed
  • self-seed
Translations Edit

Etymology 2 Edit

see +‎ -d ( “ past tense suffix; variant of -ed ” ) .

Verb Edit
  1. ( dialectal ) simple past tense and past participle of see

Latin word for seed From Middle English seed , sede , side , from Old English sēd , sǣd ( “ seed, that which is sown ” ) , from Proto-Germanic *sēdiz ( “ seed ” ) , from Proto-Indo-European