Jiffy Seed Starting Mix For Weed

Make the Best Seed Starting Mix for Dirt Cheap (It’s Organic Too) The best DIY seed starting mix needs only three ingredients, and you can find them all in your local garden center. Save money Right now it's in miracle gro seed starting soil. And so far its doing great. I was thinking I should just keep it in this soil. Good idea or no? If your initial germination process was successful, it’s time to move your cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets. The goal of this process is to provide new

Make the Best Seed Starting Mix for Dirt Cheap (It’s Organic Too)

The best DIY seed starting mix needs only three ingredients, and you can find them all in your local garden center. Save money and get my no-fail recipes for organic seed starting mix and potting mix that you can easily make at home (all without complicated soil amendments and fertilizers). Keep them dry and you can store them to use next season too.

When it comes to gardening, I’m all for getting started on a shoestring.

But where I feel I get the most value, especially if I’m starting hundreds of seeds (which isn’t hard to do in a season when you think about it), is in making my own seed starting mix.

Disclosure: All products on this page are independently selected. If you buy from one of my links, I may earn a commission.

What is seed starting mix?

Go to a nursery and you’ll realize two things about seed starting mixes.

First, they’re relatively expensive. Sure, the price tag on a typical 8-quart bag doesn’t seem too bad, but then you bring it home and realize that 8 quarts isn’t really going to cut it when you have a whole flat of seeds to sow.

Second, some seed starting mixes contain chemical agents to hydrate the soil or supplements to supercharge your plants, which—for starting seeds—are completely unnecessary.

This is because all the nutrients that a seedling needs in its initial stage of life (before it develops its first true set of leaves) is contained in the seed. Think of it like an egg yolk for a baby chick.

A seed does not need fertilizer, compost, or beneficial microbes to germinate, nor does a seedling need any of that to grow healthy and strong in the first couple weeks. (You can read more about seed to seedling anatomy in this post—it’s truly amazing how self-contained seeds are.)

Soilless seed starting mixes should only contain three ingredients — and you read that right, soil is not one of them.

I remember being confused when I first learned about soilless mixes. How does a plant grow without soil?

It all comes down to starting seeds versus growing plants. In the beginning, seedlings just don’t have the same needs their grown-up selves do.

The best seed starting mix (which you’ll learn to DIY below) is made of perlite, vermiculite, and sphagnum peat moss.

This blend is made specifically for seed starting, and it’s very light and fine-grained to help promote baby root growth and ensure the mix doesn’t get compacted in seed starting cells or seed starting containers (which are usually only 1 to 3 inches in size—tiny!).

Is seed starting mix necessary?

You may be wondering why you need to use a soilless seed starting mix when you normally just plant your seeds in the garden, straight in the soil.

Here’s the thing: Garden soil has the advantage of being in the ground and living in harmony with the soil food web. It’s ideally well-draining and somewhat forgiving, as you tend to let Mother Nature take over and aren’t as obsessed over what does or doesn’t take off.

Unfortunately, garden soil tends to be too dense for seed starting and potting. It’s full of weed seeds. It’s teeming with microbes (both good and bad) and because they’re now constrained in an indoor environment without natural checks and balances, they can wreak havoc on your seedlings in the form of damping off or fungal diseases.

If you’re going to put forth the effort to start your seeds indoors, nurture them, and harden them off until it’s time to transplant, seed starting mix will give you greater success rates so you don’t waste seeds (or time).

What’s the difference between potting soil and seed starting mix?

Generally speaking, potting soil is a growing medium that contains topsoil (in other words, plain old dirt) and some combination of bark, perlite, vermiculite, peat, humus, manure, and/or other fertilizers.

Potting mix is a similar growing medium that’s usually soilless, though commercially, you may find the terms are interchangeable and refer to the same thing. (You should always check the label of any bag you buy.)

Potting soil and potting mix aren’t ideal for seed starting because:

  • They have a coarser texture than seed starting mix, and you’ll often find chunks of bark in potting soil.
  • They don’t drain as well as seed starting mix.
  • They’re sometimes too rich in nutrients.

It’s not the end of the world to use potting soil or potting mix to start your seeds, but you’ll be paying a premium for ingredients that aren’t needed for germination.

On the other hand, if you don’t want to mess with repotting seedlings and just want to plant the seeds in their permanent container, you can start your seeds in a good potting mix that’ll continue to help them grow sturdy and strong.

Get my recipe for homemade potting mix below.

The best DIY seed starting mix needs only 3 ingredients

That’s the benefit of making your own seed starting mix at home—no synthetic fertilizers or synthetic wetting agents to worry about, just simple organic ingredients to get your seeds off to a great start.

Together, these ingredients provide the perfect level of fluffiness, drainage, and moisture retention for starting seeds.

    Sphagnum peat moss (not to be confused with the coarser and more fibrous sphagnum moss that’s typically used to line floral baskets) is an excellent, sterile, moisture-retaining medium. The finer the fiber, the more water-holding capacity it has.

An alternative to peat moss is coco coir. This material is similar to peat in terms of look, feel, and moisture retention, but is made from the fiber of coconut shells.

All three ingredients are easy to find at most garden centers, but I’ve also linked my favorite sources online (below) if you can’t find them at your local nursery.

Basic Seed Starting Mix Recipe

  • 1 part sphagnum peat moss (or coco coir)
  • 1 part perlite
  • 1 part vermiculite

A “part” refers to any generic unit of measurement to make the quantity you need, as long as it’s consistent: a scoop, a bucket, or a bag of each ingredient.

Combine all the ingredients in a clean tub or bucket, and saturate the mix with water. Stir the mixture with your hands or a trowel until it’s thoroughly moistened but not soggy (like a wrung-out sponge).

Add as much water as the mixture will absorb. You might be surprised to see how much it holds—peat moss can absorb 16 to 26 times its weight in water.

This initial watering makes it easier to keep the mix uniformly moist throughout the seed starting period, as peat moss can be difficult to re-wet if it’s been left to dry out.

Fill your seedling pots with the homemade seed starting mix, add seeds, and sprinkle a thin layer of vermiculite over your seeds if they need darkness to germinate. (Your seed packets should give any special instructions.)

See also  How To Germinate Weed Seeds In A Bag

You can save leftover seed starting mix for next season, or use it as the basis of your potting mix.

How to make the best potting mix for transplanting seedlings

With potting mix, we want to increase the ratio of peat moss (or coco coir) to up the moisture retention so our potted plants don’t dry out as quickly.

A basic potting mix is a good starter medium for transplants, but you’ll want to amend it with compost, garden lime, worm castings, kelp meal, or other supplements depending on the nutritional needs of your plants.

Basic Potting Mix Recipe

  • 6 parts sphagnum peat moss (or coco coir)
  • 1 part perlite
  • 1 part vermiculite

Enriched Potting Mix Recipe

  • 4 parts sphagnum peat moss (or coco coir)
  • 2 parts compost
  • 1 part perlite
  • 1 part vermiculite

Enriching your potting mix with compost will help your seedlings and transplants thrive after the cotyledons die off. I like to start with well-aged compost, then add other amendments that inject a jolt of nutrients as well as increase microbial activity in the potting mix.

So just how cheap is homemade seed starting mix?

Let’s do a little math here and see how much we can save with this DIY.

A well-known brand of seed starting mix from a big-box garden center runs about $5 for an 8-quart bag.

While that doesn’t sound like much, note that 8 quarts is only 0.27 cubic foot.

Buying the individual ingredients from the same store means I can make a little over 1 cubic foot of DIY organic seed starting mix for around $8.

The same amount of pre-made seed starting mix from the national brand costs $20. That’s more than double the cost for a product that’s ridiculously fast and easy to make.

Some people might feel a little hesitant about the initial investment (2 cubic feet of vermiculite = $20, 2 cubic feet of perlite = $17, 3 cubic feet of peat moss = $12), but a little goes a long way.

If you keep these ingredients dry, they’ll never go bad and you’ll have plenty for your seed starting and potting needs.

Common questions about seed starting mix and potting mix

Does seed starting mix or potting mix go bad?

Since seed starting mix and potting mix are soilless mixes, they don’t “go bad” or expire if they’ve been properly stored in a dry location. You can still use these mixes years after you make or buy them, but with one caveat.

One of the main ingredients in seed starting and potting mixes—peat moss—is an organic material that naturally decomposes over time. It doesn’t have a very long shelf life and after one or two years (from the time you purchase it), the fiber starts breaking down, making it ineffective at its primary job: to hold moisture.

Expiration in this case doesn’t mean the peat turned moldy or smelly (and it doesn’t as long as it’s been kept dry)—just that it loses its structure.

So while you can still use old seed starting mix or potting mix past its “expiration,” you’ll likely have to replenish the peat to maintain its water-holding capacity.

Can you reuse seed starting mix or potting mix?

You can reuse seed starting mix or potting mix as long as you didn’t have any problems with pests or diseases.

Let the old seed starting or potting mix dry out before storing in a bucket, storage bin, or clean trash bin, and keep it dry until you’re ready to use it again.

You’ll likely only get one reuse before the quality of the seed starting or potting mix is diminished, since one of its main ingredients, peat moss, is a natural fiber that breaks down over time (especially if it’s been wet).

What can you do with old seed starting mix or potting mix?

Old seed starting and potting mixes that need to be rejuvenated can be mixed in with new soilless mixes to give them a second life. They can also be added to your garden soil to help improve soil structure. (In either case, just make sure they’re free of any pests or diseases so you’re not introducing problems to new plantings.)

But if you don’t plan to reuse your seed starting or potting mix, you can just add it to your compost pile and let it break down naturally.

Do you need to sterilize seed starting mix or potting mix?

I don’t recommend sterilizing your seed starting or potting mix because it puts your seedlings and plants at a disadvantage from a biological standpoint.

Sterilization kills all bacteria—both good and bad. Without these microbes providing natural checks and balances that weed out weak plants and strengthen the healthy ones, your plants—which have been coddled in a “perfect” sterile environment inside your home—become unable to fend for themselves once they’re out in the garden.

3-Ingredient Organic Seed Starting Mix

The best DIY seed starting mix has only 3 ingredients. Save money and get my no-fail recipe for organic seed starting mix you can easily make at home.

Materials

  • 1 part sphagnum peat moss (or coco coir)
  • 1 part perlite
  • 1 part vermiculite

Tools

  • Clean tub or bucket

Instructions

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a clean tub or bucket, and saturate the mix with water.
  2. Stir the mixture with your hands or a trowel until it’s thoroughly moistened but not soggy (like a wrung-out sponge). Add as much water as the mixture will absorb.
  3. Fill your seedling pots with the homemade seed starting mix, add seeds, and sprinkle a thin layer of vermiculite over your seeds if they need darkness to germinate. (Your seed packets should give any special instructions.)

Notes

A “part” refers to any generic unit of measurement to make the quantity you need, as long as it’s consistent: a scoop, a bucket, or a bag of each ingredient.

Did you make this project?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

Where to buy seed starting mix

Black Gold 8-Quart Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Plus | Premiere Horticulture 1-Cubic-Foot Sphagnum Peat Moss | Nature’s Premium 1-Pound Brick Coco Coir | GROW!T 1.5-Cubic-Feet Premium Loose Coco Coir | Black Gold 8-Quart Perlite | Espoma 1-Cubic-Foot Organic Perlite | Espoma 8-Quart Organic Vermiculite | Espoma 1-Cubic-Foot Organic Vermiculite | Dr. Earth 1 1/2-Cubic-Feet All-Purpose Compost

This post updated from an article that originally appeared on March 15, 2011.

Linda Ly

I’m a plant lover, passionate road-tripper, and cookbook author whose expert advice and bestselling books have been featured in TIME, Outside, HGTV, and Food & Wine. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is my latest book. Garden Betty is where I write about modern homesteading, farm-to-table cooking, and outdoor adventuring—all that encompass a life well-lived outdoors. After all, the secret to a good life is. Read more »

81 Comments
Amar Choudhary
Ken Long

Do you add any lime to the seed starting mix?
The base mix by itself comes out very acidic, about 4.5 ph. just like the peat moss. Compare this to the Espoma Organics seed starting mix, which is just peat moss, perlite, and lime, at about 6.5 ph.

Linda Ly

Did you have the base mix tested to determine the pH? In my experience, peat moss does very little to acidify soil (in seed starting mixes or in garden soil). The pH is acidic to start (when peat is first added) but neutralizes after about a week of being watered, and most seeds don’t germinate until then. So there’s no need to add lime to seed starting mix. I’ve yet to find any ag studies that support the common belief that peat is an effective acidifier by itself.

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Gene @The California Table

wow, this is an especially informative discussion of seed starting mix (and some good info on potting soil mix, too), thank you for all the education!
I wanted to add that many gardeners are finding that coir has such a high salt content that seedlings fail to thrive in mixes made with coir. Recently, a company in Pittsburgh started offering PittMoss, a soil-less planting mix. Their product “Plentiful” seems to work well. Using it is a little bit of an adjustment…it looks lumpy but it IS light and fluffy and it doesn’t change color much when it’s wet (so I have to be careful to water enough and not too much).
It’s all recycled paper products and sold in approximately 2 cu ft bags, online.
Tho the Canadian Peat Moss Association is succeeding at farming peat sustainably; there is this demand for seed starting mix that does not use peat, so PittMoss may be the first, but probably not the last, company to figure out how to reuse waste paper:) I love innovation!
Hope this helps as we all make our own decisions (as Garden Betty carefully reminds us is our own responsibility) based on the best information we have and our own best intentions. Happy Gardening!

Linda Ly

Great info, thank you Gene. I hadn’t heard of PittMoss but that sounds like a promising alternative, or at least another option people can try and see if they like it!

Gene @The California Table

I should have also stated that in San Diego, diy mix cost about the same as commercially available seed starting mix! Prices are just so high here, on everything; so, this year I planted some seeds in commercial mix and others in the paper-based product I mentioned. All of my seedlings took off, doing great:) Except some seeds that were a gift and from a seed company I haven’t ever bought from, so…. when you find high performing seeds, stick with that company:)

Helpful site – however, just wondering why you recommend peat when it is a non-renewable resource that sequesters carbon and harvesting it destroys habitats which take hundreds if not thousands of year to grow back?

Linda Ly

Hi Anne, I’ve answered the peat vs. coco coir debate a few times in the past if you scroll down a bit in the comments, but I’ll copy and paste one of my previous responses here:

If you read my post in its entirety, you’ll see that my seed starting and potting mix recipes both offer coco coir as an option if you can’t find or don’t want to use peat moss.

I know some people prefer coco coir over peat moss because it’s thought to be better for the environment, but truth is, coco coir requires quite a bit of processing. Even though the material itself is made from a waste product, the processing produces more waste products and has other detrimental effects on the countries and industries where it’s made. Not going to argue over which product—coco coir or peat—is more sustainable, as they both have pros and cons.

All that to say: peat is perfectly acceptable to use from an environmental standpoint, especially if you’re just using it to pot up plants, and not en masse as a soil conditioner. Coco coir is far from being the eco-friendly alternative it’s claimed to be, and there is little evidence to support that claim.

You’re always welcome to do your own research and draw your own conclusions on this, based on what your personal definition of sustainability is.

Suella

HI Linda – thanks for this recipe. As it has no nutrients in it, at what stage do you report the seedlings so they start to grow? My experience is that my seedlings sit at the 2 cotyledons stage, and I’ve concluded that they need nutrients to grow on. Am I right?

Linda Ly

You should repot the seedlings once they develop a few sets of true leaves—by that point, they’ve used up their nutrient stores.

Samantha

Hi Linda When you say to replenish the peat for old seed starting mix, do you mean I should buy peat and mix it in? If I just keep putting more of the seed starting mix in the cups once the seeds germinate does that count as replenishing the peat? Or could I just mix my new seed starting mix with my old one. (FYI my old mix is from 9 years ago.) Many thanks for your help!

carole otness

Thanks so much for your post. Great info.
One thing that may have not been mentioned in the replies is the harm that our using peat moss does to the planet. We (USA) get most of our peat moss from the bogs of Canada. We need to be preserving these bogs as they are crucial to keeping the balance in nature.
I will be trying your “recipe” using the coco coir.
Thanks again, best wishes to you,
Carole O.

Steve

Useful post! I’m thinking of trying the seed starting mix recipe shortly (the coco coir version).

I have a question though – with the 1:1:1 ratio of coir/vermiculite/pearlite, does the one part coir refer to dry coir or hydrated coir? That is, should I be wetting the coir before measuring it for this recipe? I’m a bit confused here, because most of the other recipes I’ve seen seem to use a far higher ratio of coir (like 60-70% of the total volume, at least).

Ellen

Hi, I’m starting seeds indoors for the first time and feel like I’m missing a step, when do I move seedlings from the little containers with starting mix to larger containers with potting soil?

I am a gardening beginner. I wonder if I can add some crushed egg shell into the basic seed starting mix, or moist the mix with boiled egg shell water? Just in case I transplant the seedlings a little late and they need some nutrient…?

Can you grow a marijuana plant in seed starting soil?

Right now it’s in miracle gro seed starting soil. And so far its doing great. I was thinking I should just keep it in this soil. Good idea or no?

halfaweek
Active Member

I find that it does not hold water very well and drys out to fast end up watering all the time instead of once a week

GodofArmageddon
Member

That’s true, but i don’t really mind watering it a lot. But besides that do you think it’s a good soil?

dank smoker420
Well-Known Member

ive used that before if i did again i would mix in some jiffy seed starter mix or some verm. i like to use the jiffy seed starter mix and perlite as my soil. i hear people talk bad about the jiffy mix saying that it isnt good but ive had great success with it.

halfaweek
Active Member

I really dont find a problem with it other than watering its just that the water does not stay then the nute i added dont stay big waste i use a grow mix from my hydro store its really close to a seedling mix just holds water better

Wetdog
Well-Known Member

Right now it’s in miracle gro seed starting soil. And so far its doing great. I was thinking I should just keep it in this soil. Good idea or no?

I know a grower that uses nothing but MG seed starting mix start to finish and has done so for years.

Hilltop112
Well-Known Member

seed mix doesn’t have alot of nutrients in it and as pointed out above dried out alot quicker than normal soil, You could grow in Seed mix but why not spend the little extra for some real soil and get better yields?

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beecee
Active Member

i used the seed mix just to start and i thought it worked great. when it was time to transplant most of the seed mix just fell of the roots and the transplant was very easy. they took to the new soil very quickly. no signs of stress. not sure i would want to do the whole process in it though.

bird mcbride
Well-Known Member
Izoc666
Well-Known Member

Yes GOD, it will be fine just use this seed starter soil ! thats way you can control the nutrients for this plant. and hand watering daily, it will make your plant grow real faster. Since im soilless guy, gotta love this method

Happy growing and peace

Johndoe77
Member

Jiffy is great for starting seeds but YES it does dry out really fast if you remove your dome. I found good results by mixing a 60 percent jiffy and 40 percent coco. My seeds were up in 48 hours and I plant straight in seed starting trays. I don’t do the paper towel as I find it wastes a few days.

Hollatchaboy
Well-Known Member

Jiffy is great for starting seeds but YES it does dry out really fast if you remove your dome. I found good results by mixing a 60 percent jiffy and 40 percent coco. My seeds were up in 48 hours and I plant straight in seed starting trays. I don’t do the paper towel as I find it wastes a few days.

You prolly won’t get any response from the OP, or anybody else in this thread, seeins how they haven’t posted in the thread since 2012.

Transplanting Cannabis Seedlings Into Jiffy Pellets

If your initial germination process was successful, it’s time to move your cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets. The goal of this process is to provide new sprouts with a medium in which they can establish a small, but strong root zone.

New growers often skip the first stage of germination and sow cannabis seeds directly into moist soil, only later to be disappointed when seeds cease to sprout. This fruitless process can be caused by two reasons. First, if the soil is too wet, seeds can become waterlogged and turn to rot; second, cannabis seeds germinating in soil often have an unpredictable trajectory. If sown too deep, for example, the taproot may search for oxygen above ground and send the rest of the plant deeper into the soil. With the paper towel method, however, cannabis seedlings have the best chance of successful germination. Once the taproot is exposed, growers can avoid root rot, successfully predict the trajectory of the plant and safely transfer seedlings into their next home.

Ready to get growing? Watch our YouTube Series or read the following article to learn more about transplanting cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets.

Step #1: Soak Jiffy Pellets

Jiffy’s are small, cost-effective, compressed peat pellets. Because of their size and highly porous nature, Jiffy pellets are ideal for germination. Begin the process by preparing a nutrient solution of B vitamins and water. B vitamins reduce plant stress during transition phases of growth, promote root development and usually contain absorbable elements like potassium. About 2 litres or half a gallon of water will be sufficient for hydrating four Jiffy Pellets.

After the nutrient solution is prepared, toss your Jiffy pellets in to soak. Wait 5-10 minutes for the Jiffy’s to adequately absorb the nutrient solution. You can check if your Jiffy’s are prepared by gently squeezing the outside of the pellet. If any pieces of peat haven’t been loosened, place them back into the nutrient solution for another 5 minutes. Once the Jiffy pellets are thoroughly soaked, gently wring them out and place them to the side. Like the paper towel method, the goal of this process is not to bog down your seedlings with a soaking wet environment, but rather provide them with a moist, dark area, with high levels of humidity.

Step #2: Transplanting Seedlings Into Jiffy Pellets

Examine each sprout: if the taproot is at least ¼” long, they are ready to be transplanted into jiffy pellets. Carefully take each seedling and place them in their respective pellet with the taproot facing down. Tweezers may be useful in this task, as long as they have been sanitized beforehand with boiling water, alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. Finally, gently cover the seed shell in a small amount of soil. Do not compress any of the topsoil covering the seed. The point of layering the shell in soil is just to provide your germinating seeds with an adequate amount of darkness and humidity.

Step #3: Place Seedlings in a Germination Tray and Dome

Take your expanded jiffy pellets and place them in a standard 10” x 20” germination tray. Then, cover them with an appropriate 4” or 7” humidity dome. Since your seedlings will be living in this tray for the next 10-14 days, there are several tools available to help manage and control the environment. A light source, heating mat and digital thermometer/hygrometers are just a few examples of tools needed to stabilize the environment within this tray. Here are some of the features of each piece of equipment:

Lighting:

Choose a low wattage, low-intensity light source. T5 fluorescents or LED lighting is a great option to consider. At this stage, the light source is only there to encourage upward movement, not vigorous growth.

Heat Mat:

A heating mat’s purpose is to raise the temperature of a small space to an adequate level. Especially during the colder seasons, a heating mat may be essential for providing your seedlings with a constant temperature of at least 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21C). Also, consider purchasing a heat mat temperature control gauge to maximize the efficiency of your tools.

Digital Monitors:

The purpose of a digital thermometer/hygrometer is to measure the constant temperature and humidity of a given space. Some monitors even come with extended probes, allowing you to measure the temperature/humidity of specific sections of the humidity dome. For the best outcome, attempt to keep your seedlings in an environmental range of 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit (21-24C) and a minimum 70-80% relative humidity

Step #4: Set It, But Don’t Forget It

Over the next few weeks, your seedlings will begin to develop a root zone that will spread through the jiffy pellet. Also, the “true leaves” of your seedlings will begin to appear. Unlike the “sucker leaves” which first emerge from the seed shell, true leaves will be much larger, resemble typical cannabis leaves, and indicate future growth, progression and plant establishment.

This period of growth will be slow: in some cases, the transition period can take up to 14 days. So, don’t worry if you can’t see measurable growth overnight. Set your plants up for success, leave them be, but don’t forget them. Monitor your tools, control levels of temperature and humidity, and if necessary, spray your plants with a light solution of B vitamins or liquid seaweed solution. Be patient and soon enough, your seedlings will be ready to continue growing as established plants during the vegetative stage.

Join us for more information about growing cannabis at home! For more information on transplanting your cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets, contact our team at Grow Your Four.