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how many seeds do you need to grow a plant

How many weed seeds do you need to grow a plant?

To grow weed, you need high quality marijuana seeds. But how many seeds do you need to grow weed? And then there’s the question: how many marijuana plants do you want to grow?

This ultimately determines how many seeds you need. Based on your wishes, you calculate the number of marijuana seeds you need.

How many seeds do I need to grow a weed plant?

You might think that you need one cannabis seed to grow a plant. And basically that’s right. But it is possible that not every seed germinates. After all, you are dealing with a natural product.

So what if you plan to grow five plants and one or more seeds don’t germinate? Then you won’t achieve the intended yield and you have to purchase seeds again. It’s therefore wise to use several seeds per plant.

In order to calculate exactly how many cannabis seeds you need, you have to take two determining factors into account:

  • The type of cannabis seeds (regular seeds or feminized)
  • The germination rate

Type of seeds (regular or feminized)

In this blog we assume that you buy cannabis seeds for growing cannabis. For this you can choose between regular seeds or feminized cannabis seeds. Both types differ from each other and have an influence on the final result. The differences are explained below.

Regular cannabis seeds

With regular cannabis seeds, the genus of the plant has not yet been determined. When choosing regular seeds the chance that the seed will develop into a female plant is about 60%. The chance that the seed develops into a male plant is therefore 40%. And because male plants do not produce buds (read: marijuana), you need several marijuana seeds to increase the chance that you will eventually grow a female plant.

Feminized cannabis seeds

With feminized cannabis seeds you don’t have the risk of a flowering male plant. Because female seeds produce 99.9% of a female weed plant. This is why most growers choose feminized seeds or autoflowering seeds

Auto flowering seeds are basically feminized seeds, but have the advantage that they flower automatically (read more about the difference between feminized cannabis seeds and autoflower seeds). However, feminized seeds are more expensive than regular seeds. Depending on your budget and growing skills you will choose the type of weed seed.

The germination rate

In addition to the type of cannabis seed, nature always has an influence on the germination process. After all, the cannabis seed is a natural product and this means that not every seed is viable and germinates.

From experience we know that 93% of the cannabis seeds grow into a plant. This is of course a very high success rate, but not 100%. So you will have to use extra seeds in order to have the certainty of eventually becoming a weed plant.

We therefore advise you to take into account an average germination percentage of 90% when calculating the number of seeds you need for your cultivation. This gives just that little bit extra certainty.

Reading tip: Our blog about ‘Germinating marijuana seeds’ explains how to optimize the success rate to 100%.

Number of weed seeds needed to grow

Based on the above information it’s quite easy to calculate how many seeds you need to grow weed. For your convenience, we have placed the results in the table below.

Question: How many weed seeds do you need to grow a plant? Here you find all the answers about the number of seeds you need to grow a nice weed plant!

How to Grow Plants From Seeds Step by Step

Maybe you want grow plants from seeds to save money. It’s definitely cheaper than buying transplants. It will also be easier to find seeds of varieties not typically available for sale as transplants. Whatever the reason, starting plants from seeds is probably not a hard as you think. And growing plants all the way from seed to maturity is one of gardening’s most rewarding endeavors.

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Here are the basics in 10 steps.

1. Choose a container.

Seed-starting containers should be clean, measure at least 2-3 inches deep and have drainage holes. They can be plastic pots, cell packs, peat pots, plastic flats, yogurt cups, even eggshells. As long as they are clean (soak in a 9 parts water to one part household bleach for 10 minutes), the options are endless. You can also buy seed-starting kits, but don’t invest a lot of money until you’re sure you’ll be starting seeds every year. If you start seeds in very small containers or plastic flats, you’ll need to transplant seedlings into slightly larger pots once they have their first set of true leaves. Keep in mind that flats and pots take up room, so make sure you have enough sunny space for all the seedlings you start.

2. Start with quality soil.
Sow seeds in sterile, seed-starting mix or potting soil available in nurseries and garden centers. Don’t use garden soil, it’s too heavy, contains weeds seeds, and possibly, disease organisms. Wet the soil with warm water before filling seed-starting containers.

3. Plant at the proper depth.
You’ll find the proper planting depth on the seed packet. The general rule of thumb is to cover seeds with soil equal to three times their thickness – but be sure to read the seed packet planting instructions carefully. Some seeds, including certain lettuces and snapdragons, need light to germinate and should rest on the soil surface but still be in good contact with moist soil. Gentle tamping after sowing will help. After planting your seeds, use a spray bottle to wet the soil again.

4. Water wisely.
Always use room-temperature water. Let chlorinated water sit overnight so chlorine can dissipate or use distilled water. Avoid using softened water. It’s important to keep soil consistently moist, but avoid overwatering, which promotes diseases, that can kill seedlings. Try not to splash water on leaves. An easy way to avoid this – as well as overwatering – is to dip base of your containers in water and allow the soil to absorb moisture from the bottom until moist. Some seed-starting kits supply a wicking mat that conducts water from a reservoir to dry soil. This may be the most goof-proof method of watering seedlings but you still have to be careful that the soil doesn’t stay too wet. Whatever you do, don’t miss a watering and let seeds or seedlings dry out. It’s a death sentence.

5. Maintain consistent moisture.
Prior to germination, cover your container to help trap moisture inside. Seed-starting kits typically come with a plastic cover. You can also use a plastic bag, but it should be supported so it doesn’t lay flat on the soil. Remove covers as soon as seeds sprout. Once seedlings are growing, reduce watering so soil partially drys, but don’t let them wilt.

6. Keep soil warm.
Seeds need warm soil to germinate. They germinate slower, or not at all, in soils that are too cool. Most seeds will germinate at around 78°F. Waterproof heating mats, designed specifically for germinating seeds, keep soil at a constant temperature. You can buy them in most nurseries and garden centers. Or, you can place seed trays on top of a refrigerator or other warm appliance until seeds sprout. After germination, air temperature should be slightly below 70°F. Seedlings can withstand air temperature as low as 50°F as long as soil temperature remains 65-70°F.

7. Fertilize.
Start feeding your seedlings after they develop their second set of true leaves, applying a half-strength liquid fertilizer weekly. Apply it gently so seedlings are not dislodged from the soil. After four weeks, apply full-strength liquid fertilizer every other week until transplanting.

8. Give seedlings enough light.
Not enough light leads to leggy, tall seedlings that will struggle once transplanted outdoors. In mild winter areas, you can grow stocky seedlings in a bright south-facing window. Farther north, even a south-facing window may not provide enough light, especially in the middle of winter. Ideally, seedlings need 14-16 hours of direct light per day for healthiest growth. If seedlings begin bending toward the window, that’s a sure sign they are not getting enough light. Simply turning the pots won’t be enough – you may need to supply artificial lighting. Nurseries and mail order seed catalogs can provide lighting kits. Follow instructions carefully.

9. Circulate the air.
Circulating air helps prevents disease and encourages the development of strong stems. Run a gentle fan near seedlings to create air movement. Keep the fan a distance away from the seedlings to avoid blasting them directly.

10. Harden off seedlings before transplanting outdoors.
Before moving seedlings outdoors, they need to be acclimatized to their new, harsher surroundings. This procedure is called “hardening off.” Click here to learn more.

Want to start your plants using seeds? Following these 10 simple steps in the gardening process will teach you how to grow plants from seeds step by step.