How Long To Soak Weed Seeds In Water

The most known methods to sprout your seeds and get your grow cycle going in no time. thought i might try soaking for germination instead of paper towels. how long do you guys going this route let them soak before the soil? Seed priming lets you get to the fun part of growing faster while increasing success rates and even yields.

Germination Guide for Autoflowering Seeds

Seed germination is the first part of a successful grow cycle, to help you start your cannabis plants with the right foot, here’s an autoflower germination guide that can be used not only for cannabis but for tomatoes, mangos, strawberries. you name it!

Sebastian Good is talking about the best way to start your autoflower seed and germinates Strawberry Pie Auto.

So here’s how to germinate cannabis seeds with the best-known methods and a couple of tips that will get you harvesting in no time.

1. First Things First: Know the anatomy of your cannabis seed

The process of autoflower germination can take up to 10 days, in order to do everything correctly and know if everything’s going well, we need to know a little bit more about the seed. First of all, we need to understand the anatomy of a cannabis seed. The cannabis seed has a dark brown, hard, and often striped, shell, this shell is what protects the insides which are extremely fragile.

When germinating, we need to hydrate the seed, this will soften the seed’s shell and allow water to reach the embryo, when the water reaches it, the embryo will “activate” and start developing.

Have in mind that it’s possible to drown the seed, so we need to keep an eye on moisture levels, also making sure it doesn’t dry out. With a softened shell, it will be easier for the radicle to come out and this is when you’ll see the white taproot slowly appearing, and once it reaches 2-3cm, it’s time to plant it.

As soon as the seedling comes out of the medium, you’ll often see the shell stuck on top of the cotyledons, which are the tiny round leaves that you’re able to see once the shell has detached from the seedling. Those leaves are responsible for feeding the plant until the first set of true leaves appear. Also, there isn’t the best way to germinate marijuana seeds, you can do it any way you want, as long as you keep proper conditions, your seeds will germinate. So, if you’re wondering how do you germinate autoflowering seeds? Read along for the best methods.

2. The Best Conditions For Germinating Seeds

As you may know, cannabis plants need certain conditions depending on the stage they’re in, maintaining these conditions are the best way to ensure your plants will thrive, and when talking about seeds and germination, it’s no different.

Obviously, you can grow cannabis plants in less-than-ideal conditions and they will still grow but it may end up affecting the yields or quality of your harvest.

When talking about germinating auto seeds, germinating in less-than-ideal conditions will decrease the chances of sprouting, so unlike growing cannabis in bad conditions, which will still grow but can affect the harvest, germinating in bad conditions can end up killing your seeds. So when germinating autoflowers you should keep the temperature between 21-26°C and the humidity as close as 90% as you can.

3. Top Tricks For Germinating Old Seeds

As said above, germinating in the ideal conditions will guarantee successful germination but sometimes seeds may be old or have been kept in bad conditions and can be hard to germinate. So, to help you germinate old seeds, here are a couple of tricks that will increase the chances of germination. But first of all, you need to know the best conditions to avoid these problems.

How To Properly Store Seeds

If you are storing seeds for your next grow cycle, you need to keep them in ideal conditions. If you’re going to germinate them during the next couple of days there’s no need to do anything extra, other than keeping them in a cool place and in complete darkness but if you’re planning to store them for months or even years, you should keep them in the fridge.

You should keep your seeds in an airtight container in a fridge set at 6-8°C with a relative humidity of between 20-30%, if you can’t set your fridge to the temperatures mentioned, just keeping them in the fridge will increase the chances of germination. Just have in mind that the better the conditions, the longer your seeds with last.

Soak in supplemented water

As cannabis seeds get old, the shell hardens and can make it hard for the water to reach the embryo, and if the water doesn’t reach the embryo, your seeds won’t sprout so if you’re dealing with old seeds, you can soak them in supplemented water.

To do this, you can fill a glass cup with water and add around 30ml of hydrogen peroxide and leave your seeds soaking for 12hs, this should do the trick. You can also use germination boosters that you find in grow shops but usually, hydrogen peroxide works, also, make sure the water is around 22°C and it’s not getting direct sunlight.

Scarification

Scarification is a method used to make ridges on the seed to help water pass through, to do this properly, you will need a piece of sandpaper but you can improvise and do it with a matchbox. The goal is to thin out the shell so that the water can reach the embryo easily, just make sure you don’t overdo it and end up harming the embryo inside.

Slightly Open The Seed

As you may have seen, the seed is made out of two halves and has a ridge around it, if your seeds are old, that ridge may end up hardening too much and the seed won’t sprout. So to help your weed seed germinate, you can use a knife or any other tool with a thin point to gently insert it in between the ridges and slightly separate it, after this process, you can soak your water and germinate it like you normally would.

4. Paper Towel Germination Method

The paper towel method is the easiest of all methods. You’ll need :

  • 2 paper towels
  • a plastic container or plates
  • water
Step 1

Moisten the paper towels and wring them out so they’re damp but not completely wet.

Step 2

Place the seeds on the paper towel, fold it over the seeds and place it in a plastic container, cover it with the lid to keep moisture in (can also use two plates instead of the plastic container, place the paper towel on a plate and use the other one to cover).

Step 3

Place the container in a slightly warm and dark place. Remember to check on it daily, we must ensure the paper towels never dry out, the seeds need to keep absorbing moisture, it’s likely that the seeds will never germinate if they don’t. Sprinkle a little bit of water if needed, you’ll know they’re ready to be transplanted when the radicle is around 1-3cm long.

See also  Weed And Seed Directions

If the paper towel starts having a bad smell, it’s a sign of too much water, let it dry for a couple of days, and if the papers continue smelling bad, change the paper towels.

5. Soaking Overnight In A Glass Of Water

After many years of experimenting and looking for the best way to germinate our Fast Buds seeds, we must say that this is definitely one of the most effective ways.

This method is especially effective for seeds with a harder shell or older seeds. You’ll need:

Step 1

As the title says, grab a glass cup and fill it half with water.

Step 2

Place the seeds in the glass and leave it in a dark place, let the seeds soak for up to 32 hours.

Step 3

Most viable seeds will sink after a couple of hours and you should see the radicle after a couple of days. Remember that some seeds may need longer until you see the radicle coming out. If they haven’t sprouted after 72 hours, add a few drops of hydrogen peroxide to kill accumulated bacteria in the water and return to the darkness for 2 more days.

6. Using A Germination Chamber

When you get a bit more experienced, you’ll wanna look for more professional tools and the germination chamber is one of them. It consists of a plastic base with small square cells (can come with up to 256 cells, each cell supports 1 seed), on top of a heat mat, also comes with a humidity dome, basically looks like a small greenhouse. They’re very cheap and you can make one at home.

The chamber can be used with any type of medium, Rockwool cubes, peat pellets, coco fiber, perlite, or even soil and they keep the best environment for sprouting seeds and the first days of the seedling.So how to germinate a marijuana seed in a germination chamber? To start germinating, make a small hole (1-2 cm) in moisten medium, cover without applying pressure, turn on the heat mat and spray the humidity dome, it should take a couple of days to see the seedling coming out.

7. Rockwool Cubes And Peat Pellets

Rockwool cubes are small cubes made of rock and sand fibers, with the consistency of cotton candy almost, they absorb a lot of water and usually are used for germinating seeds and clones. Using them along with the germinating chamber has an advantage, being easy to transplant to the next medium or container.

Rockwool and peat pellets are an easy way to germinate seeds but can be easier to overwater your seeds.

They also can be used along with clay pellets in hydroponics. One of the bad aspects of Rockwool cubes is you can easily overwater and get root rot. Peat pellets are similar to the Rockwool cubes but are made of compressed peat moss and come in a small disc shape. To germinate in either one of them, we will use the same technique explained before, moisten the Rockwool or peat pellet, make a little hole (1-2cm) and place the seed inside, cover it gently without applying pressure and you’re all done. You can place the pellet or cube directly in any type of medium or hydroponics chamber, after sprouting, the roots will continue to grow down, even if they reach the end of the Rockwool or peat pellet.

8. Planting Directly In Medium

Sometimes the simplest way is the better way. As it happens in nature, we can also sprout our seeds in our medium of your preference (coco, soil, perlite, etc..) Just grab a pencil, or even with your fingers, make a little hole (1-2cm deep), and place the seed in it, the medium must be moist but not soaking, then cover with soil without applying pressure.

Every time you transplant a seedling, it needs some time to readjust and can cause stress, thus one of the biggest benefits of this method is you don’t have to worry about damaging your seedling when transplanting or shocking it because it already is in its final place.

9. Top Tips to Improve Seed Germination

Planting the Seeds Correctly

Cannabis seeds have an oval shape with one of the ends being sharper while the other has an indent known as the crown. When germinating cannabis seeds, it’s recommended to plant the seed with the crown pointing upwards as this is the end where the cotyledons usually come out from.

Don’t Let the Substrate Dry Out

The germination process relies on moisture to activate the biological processes that provide the energy the seedling needs to break through the seed shell and start growing. This means that the more moisture absorbed, the better. Note that the keyword here is moisture, you definitely don’t want to drown your seeds. Anyway, once the seed is in the paper towels and the germination process has begun, make sure to check regularly to ensure it’s still moist, and to help with this, it’s recommended you keep it in a warm damp place.

For better germination rates, you can opt for a heating mat and/or germination chambers, but it really doesn’t matter if you’re germination your seeds in the soil, jiffy’s, Rockwool cubes, paper towels, etc… Make sure to keep the substrate moist and you will have great results.

Planting the Seed at the Right Depth

One of the bigger issues among beginner growers is planting the seed at the right depth. These problems can get worse if you are watering the substrate after the seeds are planted. Remember, burying the seed too deep can cause it to not develop while not burying deep enough can cause the taproot to over-bend and develop a weak stem, and sometimes stunt growth.

This is why we recommend burying the seed at around 2 cm deep. You can do this by using a ruler, marking the 2 cm mark on a straw, or any other utensil that allows you to do this. Then plant your seed and cover it with the substrate without pressing too hard.

Avoid Planting several Seeds in the Same Pot

Sometimes you may not have enough substrate or pots, typically, this is when you would plant multiple seeds in the same container but they usually do not develop correctly due to several reasons. Now yes, you’re saving space and substrate but you’re definitely not helping your plants thrive as first of all, the roots need enough space to grow, and germinating in the same pot can cause the roots to fight for space.

Apart from fighting for space, if all the seedlings make it to the vegetative stage, they will continue competing for light and by doing this, you will not get the most out of each plant. Lack of light can also cause the stem and branches to grow weak which can cause problems during flower so make sure to plant one seed per pot unless you’re growing in 100-200L or bigger raised beds.

10. In Conclusion

There’s no such thing as the best way to germinate marijuana seeds, a successful germination is considered when you see the first leaves, known as Cotyledons, cannabis seeds germinate correctly with relatively high temperatures and humidity. To successfully reach the flowering stage you’ll have to use different techniques, not only for sprouting but to keep the plant happy and healthy until harvest.

See also  Weed Seeds Nutrients

Whether deciding which germination method to choose or getting ready for your first successful grow setup, our advice for beginner growers will be to start with autoflowering strains. If you look for something easy, quick, and easy to maintain, like Zkittlez Auto and Gorilla Glue Auto, there’s nothing better than choosing to grow autoflowers.

first time ever growing and got some amazing colors from this strain with low temps ran it at about 58-64 for 2 weeks and got this color

How long to soak seeds?

thought i might try soaking for germination instead of paper towels. how long do you guys going this route let them soak before the soil?

greenquartz
Well-Known Member
Jerry Garcia
Well-Known Member

thought i might try soaking for germination instead of paper towels. how long do you guys going this route let them soak before the soil?

Unless they are older seeds you don’t need to soak them in anything.

I just put mine in a moist cup of soil and let it do it’s thing. don’t make it harder than it is with paper towels and soaking!

Well-Known Member

well im new and just did mine but i let them soak till they craked then planted. I took water that set out for a couple days droped in seeds 2nd morning after they cracked

dukeofbaja
New Member

I used to do paper towels but tried soaking and like it. I usually just soak them for 24 hours in a warm dark place. After 24 hours, I check them. I tap them softly to see if they sink. If they do, I plant it in soil and it usually sprouts in a day or two. If the seeds don’t sink after 24 hours, I check again at 36 and 48 hours and do the same. If they have not sunk after 48 hours, I usually plant them anyway, but rarely do they grow.

BKCSG
Active Member

out of 200 quality seeds i’ve never had one that hasn’t germinated and i’ve always put them directly into the soil. I never even touch the seeds, i just tip the bag it came in and let it fall into the little hole in the soil i made. I’ve never understood why people soak or use the paper towel method. In my opinion, the more you handle the seed, the greater the chance of wrecking the seed. Plus, you risk hurting the tap root when you transplant. Just do it in the soil. its how she likes it ; )

dukeofbaja
New Member

So true BKCSG. I just stick seeds for my veggies into the soil and they seem to do well, I have never kept track of it though.

2beanklm
Active Member
BKCSG
Active Member

I put them right into the soil and they sprout 2 1/2 to 3 days later. From what some of you are saying is you soak the seed for 24 hours and then plant it and 2 days later it sprouts? what am I losing by going directly into soil exept the chance of fucking it up? The paper towel method and soaking are neat little tricks, but why chance it and for what? to me its not worth it even if it speeds the process by a day. Its an f’ing seed.. it needs moist soil and warmth, thats it.

siccmade420
Active Member

sorry but im gonna throw a question out there. you can stick a pot of soil with seeds planted in it and leave it in a warm dark place until they sprout?

Someguy15
Well-Known Member

I like soaking them til they sink (12-24 hrs) and then strait into root riot (rapid rooter, ect) cubes. I put them under the light so it’s slightly warm and they pop in 2 or less days.

Jerry Garcia
Well-Known Member

This plant is going to take months to grow. why do you need a head start?

out of 200 quality seeds i’ve never had one that hasn’t germinated and i’ve always put them directly into the soil. I never even touch the seeds, i just tip the bag it came in and let it fall into the little hole in the soil i made. I’ve never understood why people soak or use the paper towel method. In my opinion, the more you handle the seed, the greater the chance of wrecking the seed. Plus, you risk hurting the tap root when you transplant. Just do it in the soil. its how she likes it ; )

The only time soaking is really beneficial is when you’re using OLD, DRIED seeds. But even then, if you plant them directly in soil and water them in, they will probably absorb the same amount of water.

If you bought seeds from a reputable seedbank then you can assume they are fresh enough and will germinate fine. If you found some 8 year old seeds in your sock drawer then maybe soaking them for 24 hours wouldn’t be the worst idea.

But really, if you let the taproot grow directly into the soil without handling it, you will VIRTUALLY ELIMINATE ALL stress and produce a healthier seedling.

Plus, IT’S MORE WORK!

Just put the seed 1/4 inch below the surface of the soil. 1/4 inch is pretty shallow. DON’T PLANT TOO DEEP. Just poke a hole, drop the seed and cover it up. Orientation doesn’t matter. gravity will tell the root which way to grow. Then fully saturate your medium and place by a light source. In a few days your seedling will sprout.

How to Prime Seeds for a Head Start on the Grow Season

Looking to give your seeds a head start? Seed priming lets you get to the fun part of growing faster while increasing success rates and even yields.

Few things compare to the joy of seeing that first bit of green poking through the soil. Growing is an art, and a beautiful one at that.

Germinating seeds yourself brings a sense of accomplishment as well as pure excitement for what’s to come. For impatient gardeners like me, seed priming offers a true edge in the process of seed germination, increasing success rates, and speeding things up.

What is Seed Priming?

Think of priming as hydrating seeds. Seed priming establishes consistent moisture and temperature for seeds so they begin the germination process. In many cases, seeds are primed and then the germination process is halted before roots and sprouts emerge.

This can occur because controlled priming works within a window of time between priming and pre-germination. As long as priming does not surpass the maximum length of time, seeds can safely dry back to a dormant state and await planting. Amazingly, at the time they’re sown, primed seeds will sprout more quickly and abundantly than non-primed seeds.

Seed Priming at Home

Seed priming is possible for hobby and home gardeners, although it may be more or less a little-known secret or a proud discovery of greater gardening success. Only this year did I learn the amazing experience of improving germination by priming and testing seeds in wet paper towels.

See also  How To Get Weed Seeds From Plant

Soak seeds in a small bowl of water for no more than 24 hours.

Soaking Seeds First

When priming seeds at home, you can soak seeds or use the paper towel method of germination. If soaking, place seeds in a small bowl of water and soak for no more than 24 hours. Recommendations on total soak time vary but range commonly between eight to 12 hours and absolutely no more than 24, or else the seeds might begin to rot.

Wet Paper Towel Seed Priming

The plastic baggie and paper towel method of starting seeds is a very useful technique. A kind gentleman in a Facebook gardening group suggested it for planting pea seeds to see if they’d sprout. Here are the steps:

  1. Fold a paper towel in half.
  2. Space out pea seeds on the folded paper towel.
  3. Spray room temperature tap water lightly on the paper towel.
  4. Fold it to fully cover the seeds and ensure it is evenly moist.
  5. Place the folded paper towel in a zip-top plastic baggie.
  6. Label with the date and type of seed.
  7. Place near a heating vent or on a warm surface such as the top of your fridge or microwave.

I couldn’t believe my luck the next morning! When I checked on the pea seeds in the baggies, I saw the radicles (first roots) had begun to emerge from almost all the seeds. Amazed, I proceeded to use the same wet paper towel and baggie-priming method with beans, Roma tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, cucumbers, and even fruit seeds for fun. Almost everything germinated. Brilliant!

You can gently bury the entire primed seed loosely below the soil.

As Seedlings Emerge

Prior to priming, be sure to check your local weather. Once you start the priming process at home, it’s vital to get the seeds into the ground soon after they begin germinating. In as little as 24 hours, you may see some tiny seedlings starting to push their way through the seed coats. You can gently bury the entire primed seed loosely below the soil and it should continue its journey to the surface in short time.

Why Should I Prime Seeds?

Planting primed seeds results in shorter germination times and better rates of germination. For both commercial farmers and home gardeners, seed priming saves time and optimizes growth. Here are some key advantages of using primed seeds or priming seeds yourself:

Faster Seed Germination – Moisture added when priming seeds speeds up the germination process.

Higher Rates of Germination – Seeds sprout in greater numbers when primed before planting. Proper priming can overcome seed dormancy for stubborn varieties.

More Forgiving to Temperature – Seeds go through many of their temperature-sensitive changes during priming. Therefore, they can germinate more easily in cooler temperatures, which in turn can impact heating bills in larger scale farming operations.

Reduce Fungi – It’s reported that priming seeds can lower the incidence of seedborne fungi in resulting plants.

Increase in Yield – Significantly higher yields are likely to occur with primed seeds. One study revealed a 21 percent greater yield when priming seeds first.

Higher Density and Vigor – Plants grown from primed seeds tend to be more vigorous and may also reach maturity sooner. This also means harvests may begin earlier in the growing season.

Affordable – Priming seeds at home is easy to do and you can use materials you already have around the home. It’s cheap, easy, and quite honestly, much neater than starting everything in soil first.

Environmentally-Friendly – This method of enhanced gardening is friendly to plants and the environment. Your green thumb is now even greener!

Save Valuable Planting Space – Priming seeds first speeds things up and allows you to identify viable seeds as well as potential duds. You can swiftly pot up the promising seeds and discard or bulk plant those that don’t seem viable.

Soak It — Seeds Best Suited for Priming

Starting seeds is so much fun, and it’s even better when you’re able to up the ante for quicker and better results. Consider what you’re planning to grow and whether priming the seeds can enhance your gardening experience. You can prime these seeds for quicker and more abundant germination. Try at-home priming with wet paper towels or seed soaking for the following seeds, to name a few.

Commercial Examples of Seed Priming

In professional environments, seed priming may involve a solute, whereas in-home gardeners will likely use water to prime their seeds. Even water vapor can aid in the seed priming process.

In a study of nanoparticle-mediated seed priming, seeds received a treatment of nanopriming agents, in this case turmeric oil nanoemulsions (TNE) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). This seed priming measure improved the germination of notoriously temperamental watermelon seeds and resulted in improved germination, better growth, and increased yield without altering the quality of the fruit.

Another study tested seed priming in developing countries. This study largely found “on-farm” seed priming to be significantly positive in its impacts to seed germination, plant growth, and crop yields.

Professional Seed Priming Methods

Commercial growers and suppliers rely on proven methods to prime seeds for best germination, growth, and yield. Some have their own proprietary means of priming seeds while others adhere to tried and true techniques. Here are the most common commercial priming methods.

Drum Priming – Seeds soak up moisture from controlled humidity within a rotating drum. The monitored water vapor moistens the seeds and primes them for optimal growth.

Hydropriming – While used in commercial operations, this method would also work at home. Hydropriming involves soaking seeds in water, specifically in aerated distilled water if possible.

On-Farm Seed Priming – Farmers can soak seeds overnight and allow them to dry briefly before planting. This method can reduce the overall time needed for the seeds to soak water directly from the soil.

Osmopriming – Soaking seeds in low water content paired with osmotic solution relies on osmosis to jumpstart the seeds without kicking them into true germination. Plant hormones or beneficial microorganisms may also be mixed into the priming solutions.

Solid Matrix Priming – A slower method, seeds begin in an insoluble medium that readily absorbs water, such as vermiculite. This method limits water uptake by the seeds.

Take these tips on priming seeds at face value and give it a whirl with your next planting. This is one case where it’s quick, clean, and easy to make a difference in your gardening endeavors!

Tip: Not all seeds need to be primed. Some, particularly those that are finicky when transplanted, may not be great candidates for seed priming or may sprout just fine on their own. Those that are small may simply not need it. Carrots, lettuce, radishes, and some herbs and flowers may do better without priming. If you do choose to prime these seeds, soak in a small dish of water and watch closely every few hours to avoid overdoing it. Trial and error is one of the best parts of gardening!