How Long Does It Take To Grow Feminized Weed Seeds

Thanks to Prop 207, it’s legal to grow cannabis at home in Arizona. Here’s 10 tips on buying marijuana seeds, growing flowers from gardening experts. Everyone's wondered how long marijuana plants take to grow at some time, and the answer is quite relative but we'll do our best to give you a general idea! Do you want to know how to grow feminized seeds indoors? These tips from Dutch Passion will help you grow the best feminized seeds indoors.

‘They’re all plants:’ 10 questions answered about growing cannabis at home in Arizona

The passage of Proposition 207 in Arizona, legalizing recreational cannabis, ushered in a new opportunity for the home gardener. Adults ages 21 and older are now allowed to grow a limited amount of cannabis plants at home for personal use.

“We don’t see any difference between growing cannabis and growing vegetables and growing lavender, they’re all plants,” said Ryan Jerrell, co-owner of Dig It Gardens in Phoenix.

But like growing any plant, it can be easy to overthink it, he said.

The Arizona Republic asked two experts to share their tips for beginners: Noah Wylie, master grower at The Mint Dispensary based in the East Valley, and Josh Sundberg, farmer and co-owner of Community Roots AZ in Cornville, southwest of Sedona.

Wylie has been cultivating cannabis since 2002, when he first started growing for patient use in California. Sundberg cultivates cannabis for personal use and offers workshops for other growers.

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How many cannabis plants can I grow?

Adults can grow six cannabis plants at home or no more than 12 plants in a house with more than one adult.

People can grow plants from seeds or cuttings off an existing plant, also known as clones. Sundberg said cuttings are a gray area because it’s unclear whether a cutting that hasn’t taken root yet is counted as part of the six or 12 plants Arizonans are allowed to grow.

How long does it take to grow cannabis?

On average, a plant takes 50 to 60 days before it’s ready to harvest, Wylie said. Once harvested, the plant needs to be dried for about 10 to 14 days. Growers then have the choice of consuming their cannabis, or curing the flowers another week or two for higher quality, he said.

Where can I buy cannabis seeds?

At local supplier Phoenix Seeds & Clones, people can purchase a grow consultation ranging from $75-200, including 5 to 20 seeds. Strains offered include Gorilla Cake, Tangie Cookies and Kino Vision, a high CBD strain.

As of Oct. 19, the company was sold out of seeds, but people can join an email list for an update when seeds are back in stock: phoenixseedsandclones.com.

People can also purchase cannabis seeds on websites such as Leafly. Sundberg warned that quality seeds can be pricey. Seeds are also a gamble because only female plants flower, and there’s no guarantee how many female seeds are in a packet. Feminized seeds are genetically engineered to grow only female plants, but tend to cost more.

Buyers should go with vetted sources to avoid fraudulent sellers. Sundberg recommended Canna Genetics Bank, a retailer that sells seeds from various breeders, and Neptune Seed Bank, both based in California.

Growing from seed is a trial and error process and people should be prepared to “have a few rounds that are really disappointing” before they find that one best phenotype, he advised.

Eddie Smith, co-owner of The Plant Stand of Arizona, confirmed his south Phoenix nursery would be selling cannabis seeds in the future.

Ryan Jerrell, co-owner of Dig It Gardens in central Phoenix, also said his nursery plans on selling cannabis seeds in the future, as well as “starter kits” for first-time growers.

Where can I buy a cannabis clone?

Phoenix Seeds & Clones also sells clones.

A clone is a cutting from a living cannabis plant, which can grow into a plant itself. The new plan has the same genetic makeup as the original plant, hence, a “clone.”

Wylie believes cuttings are easier than seeds for beginners., but as Proposition 207 is so new, he isn’t aware yet of any legal businesses in Arizona that sell cuttings.

If people want to clone their own plants, he recommended they plant multiple seeds at once, label each plant, and take a cutting from each one before they flower. People can then grow the cutting from whichever plant yields the best harvest.

What’s the easiest cannabis strain to grow for beginners?

Wylie suggested first-time growers start with a hybrid strain and stay away from strains that have OG in the name or are labeled “exotic,” which tend to be finicky. Popular 50/50 hybrid Blue Dream, for example, is a resilient plant that can take higher and lower temperatures, he said.

Other hybrids he suggested for beginners include Green Crack, Grape Diamonds and Cherry Garcia.

What else do I need to grow a cannabis plant?

Both Wylie and Sundberg said the key items you need to grow cannabis are nutrient-rich soil, water and light.

Both The Plant Stand and Dig It Gardens sell FoxFarm soils, a popular brand in the cannabis-growing community. Sundberg likes to use Nectar of the Gods, Blend #4, which he said can be found at PHX Hydro in west Phoenix.

Indoors, cannabis thrives best in full spectrum light similar to sunlight, so a standard incandescent bulb won’t cut it, Wylie said. He recommended starting off with an inexpensive light made for growing. Sea of Green Hydrogardens in Tempe sells various grow lights.

“I warn people… crawl before you walk,” Wylie said. “Learn to get your plant to grow all the way to fruition, harvest it, dry it, cure it. Then you can build from there. Don’t run out and buy thousands of dollars of equipment.”

Sundberg described living soil, which has active microorganisms in it, as a major game changer. Compost, mulch and worm castings can be found at the Arizona Worm Farm in Phoenix.

Where is the best place to grow my cannabis plant?

Wylie said most people will likely grow indoors, in a closet or garage, for example. About 75 degrees, more or less, is an optimal temperature, he said. In a small space with stagnant air, he suggested using a fan to move air in and out. A beginner can start in a closet with a 100-watt grow light and oscillating desk fan, and it’s enough to get going, he said.

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Some people use grow tents, which look like black boxes, but cannabis can really be grown most places as long as people are able to adapt to the environment, Sundberg said.

Sundberg said cannabis can be grown outdoors in Arizona, where come August the plants flower as the days get shorter and they’re ready to harvest by about October. It’s doable in Phoenix, even with the heat, but extra steps have to be taken to protect your plant, he said.

He recommended adding mulch to keep the soil cool. For a pot, the bigger the better for creating a buffering zone — five gallons is a good minimum, he said. Putting the pot in another pot or putting some sort of insulation barrier around it can also prevent the pot from directly baking in the sun.

While it may be tempting to spray your plants in the middle of a burning, sunny day, the water droplets on the leaves can act like tiny magnifying glasses. As with other types of plants, it’s best to water early morning. If you have to water in the middle of the day, first discharge the hot water from your hose if that’s what you’re using, and water the soil around the plant, not the leaves, he advised.

How much light does my plant need?

Once planted, the cannabis plant needs a ratio of about 18 hours light, 6 hours darkness to grow in what’s called the vegetative stage, which doesn’t produce flowers. How long you let the plant grow in this state depends on your space constraint, but Sundberg recommends beginners start small.

After a few days, growers can switch to a ratio of 12 hours light, followed by 12 hours of consecutive darkness to activate the flowering stage. If growing outside, the light of a full moon is about the maximum amount of light a plant should receive during the darkness period, Sundberg said.

How often should I water my plant?

Wylie recommended plants should be watered when the soil is dry. Growers can test this by sticking a finger into soil about halfway between the plant and edge of the pot. If the soil is warm and dry, it’s time to water.

Quality of water can make a difference in the quality of flowers. It’s worth filling up a jug of distilled or purified water at one of the various water dispensers around town to use specifically for your plants, rather than use tap water, Sundberg said.

When can I harvest my flowers?

Wylie said that after switching to the 12 hours light, 12 hours darkness stage, it takes about 50 to 60 days until it’s time to harvest. People can additionally purchase an inexpensive jeweler’s loupe if they want to look at the trichomes, or crystals, on the flowers. The plant will be ready to harvest when the majority of the trichome caps turn from translucent to milky-looking and about 10% of the caps turn an amber color. The plant can still be harvested a little earlier or later, however.

After harvesting the plant, the grower should hang the plant upside down to dry for 10 to 14 days, he continued. The stems should feel brittle when dried. After that, trim the leaves off the flowers and put the flowers in an airtight container, like a mason jar. While the flowers are consumable at this point, the flowers can be cured for a better quality.

To cure the flowers, seal the container and open it up for 20 minutes every 24 hours. It’s important that the flowers are completely dried before they’re sealed up because moisture could lead to mold, Wylie added. After a week or two, you should have the highest quality flower, he said.

Where to shop for cannabis gardening supplies in Phoenix

Phoenix Seeds & Clones: 602-883-2672, [email protected], phoenixseedsandclones.com.

Dig It Gardens: 3015 N. 16th St., Phoenix. 602-812-7476, digphx.com.

The Plant Stand of Arizona: 6420 S. 28th St., Phoenix. 602-304-0551, plantstandaz.com.

PHX Hydro: 3309 W .Catalina Dr., Suite B, Phoenix. 602-840-2080, facebook.com/PHXHydroAZ.

Sea of Green Hydrogardens: 1828 E. University Dr., Suite 11, Tempe. 480-967-2045, sea-of-green.com.

How Long Marijuana Plants Take to Grow

Are you not sure how long marijuana plants take to grow? Well, the first thing we recommend is to have patience, something that applies to pretty much everything in life. Plants need enough time to grow and develop correctly, and time is what can tell a nice productive plant from a pile of branches lacking in both foliage and yield.

Today we’re going to talk about normal growth times and the different stages that your plants will go through. Maybe some of these questions sound familiar to you;

  • How long does cannabis take to germinate/flower?
  • What can I do to make my plants flower earlier?
  • Can I speed up the growth?
  • Which is the fastest, highest yielding plant?

These questions are probably best answered with the age old phrase, time is gold. Obviously a lot of the answers are quite subjective and we can’t give any absolutely concrete times, but we’ll do our best in this article to provide you with a general idea of how long a marijuana plant takes to grow.

Firstly, we’ll begin by dividing the plants’ life cycle into a series of phases:

Germination:

Germination is defined as the period and process through which the seed changes from a seed to a sapling.

If you’re planting cuttings, then the germination period is known as the cloning and rooting period.

Germination techniques are varying in method, although the one we tend to use the most and is the most recommended involves damp kitchen paper as a base for the seed; many people use other methods, like damp cotton, straight into the earth or a jiffy, or in water.

Some growers even use germination stimulators that work with the seeds initial metabolism and reduce the germination time to about a day in most cases.

Of course, time is relative. It will depend not just on the strain, but the actual quality of the seed itself. Some determining factors are the age of the seed, how fertile it is and how it has been kept.

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Saplings tend to take around 24-72 hours to sprout, although sometimes it can take 5 days and in extreme cases it can take up to 15 days. Make sure to pay attention to the water and humidity conditions, as well as the temperature which should be at around 21-24ºC.

Growth Period:

This is also called the vegetative phase. It’s the main period of growth that your plant will go through, and probably the most important.

After managing to get your sapling to sprout and transplanting it (into soil or a jiffy), the growth period begins. Just like the name says, your plants will grow the most it’s ever going to grow and stretch upwards during this period, allowing it to get the correct shape and size to proceed to the next stage; flowering.

Like many of you probably already know, your plants will need more light during the growth phase than any other phase. Generally, 18 hours of light and 6 hours of darkness are recommended per day. A proper balance between light and dark is the key element to a successful growth period. The light is obviously very important in as far as photosynthesis, but those hours of darkness are incredibly important as well, as during that time there’s an exchange of essential elements in your plants’ metabolisms.

This period will take more or less time depending on the seed, strain and growing method. Autoflowering plants will be much faster than feminized plants and indoor crops are generally much faster than outdoor crops. Also, if you use a stronger light your crops will generally grow faster than those with less powerful bulbs.

It’s difficult to put a number on how long the growth period takes due to environmental and external factors (fertilizers and the grower’s expertise) that can interfere with crops. Generally, indoors autoflowering plants take about 3 or 4 weeks (21 to 25 days) and around 6 to 8 weeks, maybe more, for feminized strains.

Outdoors regular and feminized seeds tend to take around 8 to 9 weeks, but by growing indoors you can mess around with the timings to make them begin flowering earlier.

Flowering:

This is your cannabis plants’ last period. When it starts will depend obviously on the growth period, but the plant must also have the necessary characteristics developed to allow it to grow buds.

This means that sometimes, a month after germination your plant might still look weak or small, which means that you’ll have to let it continue its growth period for more time.

It’s also important to note that autoflowering strains will flower at their own whim; you’ll need to change the light period once they start showing signs. However, seasonal seeds will need to be helped into the flowering phase by a change in light period. To be exact, you’ll need to switch them to a 12/12h light period which induces your plants into the flowering phase.

I know we said that the growth phase’s timing was relative, but true relative is how long a flowering period can take. There really are no rules apart from certain ones preached by seed banks about their strains, although in most cases these rules are simply guidelines.

The important thing to keep in mind when trying to figure out when the flowering period is coming to an end and you need to wash out the roots is how the buds look. Although times stated by seed banks can give you a general idea, the best way to find out is to watch your bud grow until they’re buried in pistils.

Once they’ve developed that fair, the harvest time will be indicated by the maturity and oxidization of the pistils and trichomes, which become that nice amber/honey color.

Indoors, autoflowering strains will generally finish up at around 8 weeks of flowering, and feminized versions can take longer depending on the growth period, and it’s normal for them to take anywhere between 10 to 12 weeks, and in a lot of cases even more.

Drying and Curing:

This stage isn’t even classifiable like the plant’s life cycle, although we can tell you that it’s a process that will take a while and it’s just an important as the plant’s periods when it comes to gett ing top quality taste, aroma, effect and potency.

First, you’ll have to differentiate between drying and curing; the first thing you’ll need to do with your freshly-cut harvest is dry it.

Basically, you’ll have to place your harvest, cut and trimmed, in a dark, cool and dry place in a drying mesh or sock (don’t forget to clean your plants roots out thoroughly towards harvesting time). All you’ll have to do is move the buds around the mesh or sock every day so they don’t become inclined to one side or another.

This process can take a while depending on placement and terrain; from two to four weeks. The sign of a properly dried bud is being able to bend it without breaking it, but while also hearing that nice crispy sound.

After the drying process comes the curing process, like a good cheese.

It simply involves placing all of your buds in a container and leaving it to sit with a periodic opening to let the air flow. Curing can be done in different containers; plastic, glass or wood, although wood is faster than glass and glass is the most recommended as it doesn’t emit or contain any sort of toxic substances.

The container in which you deposit your harvest will need to be kept in a dark, cool and dry place. The only thing you’ll need to do will be to open the container for about five minutes a day so that the humidity can leave your bud, and you end up with a perfectly chlorophyll-free product.

This process can take anywhere from two to six weeks. The main indication of a proper curing is that the bud crunches when pressed in slightly, if you bend the stem it breaks water than bends, and the intense green color should fade, as well as the leafy green smell.

Conclusion:

According to these estimates, marijuana takes about three months to grow completely for autoflowering versions, and four to five or more months for feminized strains depending on crop method and expertise. Don’t forget that drying and curing will take a month or two more.

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We’re going to insist on the fact that depending on how you grow your plants as well as the strain you choose to grow, each phase will be longer or shorter, and therefore so will the entire life cycle. Feminized strains will take longer to be harvestable, and autoflowering strains will take less time. There’s also a new version called the “fast version” that the Sweet Seeds seed bank has developed. Also, indoor crops will take less time to be harvestable than outdoor crops.

How to grow feminized seeds indoors

Do you want to know how to grow feminized seeds indoors? These tips from Dutch Passion will help you grow the best feminized seeds indoors. More information can be found in our extensive indoor growing guide.

Choose a grow system that you can understand

Deep water culture may be one of the best ways to grow feminized seeds indoors, but it requires a good working knowledge of nutrient management, nutrient measurement and plenty of experience. Growing cannabis in coco fibre is easier and produces heavy crops. Many first time cannabis growers start growing with a soil mix bought from the local grow shop. Once you have grown a few crops your confidence will improve and you will understand the basics, and feel able to tackle more complicated grow systems. Keep your first cannabis grows as simple as you can, and use the local grow shop for advice. Your local hydroponics store is a one-stop shop for materials and advice.

Choosing feminized seeds for indoor growing

It’s never been easier to buy feminized seeds online. Although you have hundreds of varieties to choose from, your first decision is whether to buy feminized autoflower seeds or feminized photoperiod seeds.

Growing feminized autoflower seeds indoors

Feminized autoflower seeds grow from seed to harvest with 20 hours of daily light, taking around 75 days. First time cannabis growers are often recommended to grow feminized autoflower seeds, they are easy to grow and the best autoflower seeds can produce huge yields of several hundred grams per plant in good conditions. The Dutch Passion feminized autoflower seed collection is one of the best available, with lots of customer grow reviews.

Growing feminized photoperiod seeds indoors

Feminized photoperiod seeds are often simply called feminized seeds. They have two growth phases controlled by the amount of light. When growing feminized seeds indoors under 18+ hours of daily light they grow in a vegetive mode, producing leaves, roots, branches but no buds. When the amount of daily light is reduced to 12 hours the plants start to produce buds, this is known as the bloom phase, sometimes called the flowering phase. Depending on the variety, the bloom phase takes around 9 weeks of 12/12 light. One of the best tips for growing feminized seeds indoors is to provide plenty of light during bloom to maximise your harvest. For a 1.2 x 1.2m tent a 600W HPS is a good solution, and some growers will use higher light levels to maximise their harvest.

Feminized seeds indoors. Avoid over-feeding and over-watering

When growing feminized seeds indoors the two main mistakes we see are plants being over fed, and (for soil grown plants) over-watering is a common error. Cannabis roots need oxygen to thrive, they don’t like waterlogged soil. Allow the soil to partially dry out between waterings, this allows some root aeration. Over feeding plants can really slow down development, the tips of the leaves go brown and crispy – a condition known as nutrient burn. Experienced growers monitor their nutrient concentrations using an EC meter to measure Electrical Conductivity, they are a recommended grow room gadget to help optimise your grows. Over-feeding your cannabis plants is particularly damaging to young plants which can remain permanently stunted, never fully recovering afterwards. When growing feminized seeds indoors, start your plants at low nutrient concentrations and gradually increase nutrient concentration, backing off at the first sign of over feeding.

Feminized seeds indoors. Maintaining the nutrient sweet spot

The experienced cannabis grower is able to steadily increase nutrient concentrations throughout the grow without under-feeding or over-feeding his plants. Keeping your plants in this nutrient sweet spot will ensure that you feminized seeds grow into healthy, heavy yielding plants. If light levels are high, the root mass is healthy and plenty of fresh air is supplied to the grow room then you should get healthy plants with heavy blooms.

The best nutrients for feminized seed indoor growing

All of the major nutrient companies offer products that will grow good quality cannabis. Many growers will eventually settle on their own preferred nutrient brand and feel that using the same brand with increased skill and experience is the best approach.

High THC results with feminized seeds grown indoors

Combine good quality cannabis genetics with an optimised environment and you will get heavy harvests of THC rich buds. The latest research is showing that crops grown under high intensity LED grow lights have routinely higher THC levels compared to identical cuttings grown under HPS. Use of UVA and UVB supplemental light, such as the SolarSystem UVB during bloom can also increase THC levels. A selection of the best LED grow lights on the market can be found on our sister companies website, Crazy LEDs. As well as offering higher cannabinoid levels, LED grow lights produce less heat than HPS lights, use less energy and last longer. LED grow lights are the preferred choice of the serious hobby grower as well as the professional legal cannabis producers.

Dutch Passion feminized seeds for indoor growing

Dutch Passion feminized seeds and autoflower seeds are highly rated, our cannabis seed collection has never been better. And our varieties have never been as well proven or popular. The best selling Dutch Passion feminized seeds from 2017 are shown below. If you are looking for some top quality feminized seeds to grow indoors you won’t find a better and more complete collection of seeds.