Germinate Weed Seeds In Dark Or Light

You can grow your cannabis from either a seed or a clone. In commercial marijuana production, producers will often sow many seeds of a single strain and select the best plant. Just two fast questions about germinating seeds, i'm planning to use the soaking in water -> paper towel method (unless someone knows better methods ofc)… Most plants need light to grow and keep them healthy, but not all plants need light to germinate, and, as we shall see, some seeds find light a hindrance.

A Simple Guide To Germinating Cannabis Seeds

You can grow your cannabis from either a seed or a clone. In commercial marijuana production, producers will often sow many seeds of a single strain and select the best plant. During the cannabis grow stages, producers will take clones of that particular plant, allowing for uniform genetics in large production.

Since marijuana is legal in your state, you can purchase seeds or clones from the local dispensary or several seed banks online.

When is the Ideal Time of Year to Start Growing Marijuana Seeds?

The beginning of spring is the optimal time to germinate cannabis seeds for outdoor growing. Cannabis plants are annuals, meaning they will grow throughout the spring and summer before flowering in the Autumn as the days become shorter. If you’re growing your seeds inside, you can germinate them whenever you want as long as you provide them with the necessary atmosphere.

Duration Taken in Cannabis Seeds Germination

Sprouting can take anything from a few days to a week for your seeds to begin to sprout and grow into plants.

Will Seeds Germinate in a Paper Towel When Placed in The Dark?

Yes, to put it briefly, a seed will often sprout with a bit of moisture, warmth, and darkness.

A substance called phytochrome is the key to this. In light, phytochrome exists in one form, and after a time of darkness, it exists in a different form. After a few HOURS, the light form decreases to a dark state; after several MINUTES in the light, it is converted back. As a result, a seed on the soil’s surface receives enough light to maintain the dark state of phytochrome low for long enough to prevent germination. The dark version of phytochrome is only active long enough to cause germination when the seed is in complete darkness.

The tissue will help keep your sprouts moist, but it will not provide additional nutrients. They’ll have enough food to get started from seed, but they’ll require soil or food for happy roots and light to create strong green leaves.

Remember to distinguish between what a seed requires and what your seedlings require; thus, examining the plant’s requirements after germination is an intelligent idea.

What are the Optimum Temperature and Light Settings in Germination of Cannabis Seeds?

Seeds require appropriate warmth, humidity, and air to sprout efficiently. Marijuana seeds like a temperature range of 70°F to 90°F for sprouting. It’s why cannabis grow tents are dark on the outside to increase temperatures. Seeds do not require light to germinate, but seedlings need good lighting to grow.

Why Won’t My Cannabis Seeds Sprout?

When growing cannabis from seeds, seeds may fail to sprout because of various causes, including age or dryness, improper storage, incorrect cannabis germination methods, and difficulties at the seed bank.

I do not recommend disturbing or attempting to shatter the seeds at this time because they are very fragile and could be damaged. To “activate” your seed, use the “glass of water” procedure. It’s best to wait for now and be patient, ensuring they have the best sprouting conditions.

How Deep Should I Plant My Cannabis Seeds?

Direct planting is even more natural than soaking in water. Sow your seeds 1/2 inch to one inch deep in damp soil or a similar medium. Not subjecting your seedlings to transplant shock is a significant advantage of this method. They will have adjusted to their surroundings because they have grown up in them.

Bottom Line

When you want to germinate cannabis seeds, patience is essential, and this step is no exception. Taking notes is a great way to keep track of your progress and figure out what’s working and what isn’t. Refrigerate your seeds until you’re ready to start. It takes a little research and experimentation to grow cannabis, but it’s not rocket science, and it’s a VERY satisfying experience. Give home-growing a try and shop at Upper Limits Inc. for all grow tent, grow light & grow accessory product needs.

Чтобы просмотреть или добавить комментарий, выполните вход Чтобы просмотреть или добавить комментарий, выполните вход

Germinating seeds, how warm water to use and do you keep them in dark?

Just two fast questions about germinating seeds, i’m planning to use the soaking in water -> paper towel method (unless someone knows better methods ofc).

How warm water should i use to do this, and should i keep the glass of water/paper towel thing in dark or light? I read that you should maintain ambient temperature between 68-78f (20-25c) when doing this.

See also  Weed Seeds In Illinois

How you guys do it and what’s the success rate? Cheers.

ganga gurl420
Well-Known Member

I use very warm water and a splash of peroxide (to kill any fungus or bacteria that may be on the seed)
I only soak for 12 hours tho and keep it somewhere warm around 70 degrees.
I then put them in a paper towel and once again keep them warm.
Usually sprouts withing 24 to 48 hours after that.
The only time I’ve ever had an issue with seeds not sprouting was two strains, and I believe it was the breeders fault and not of my own since others had the same issue. (Maybe the seeds were too fresh or too old..idk)

Aotea Med_Men
New Member
Blossom21
Active Member

I use very warm water and a splash of peroxide (to kill any fungus or bacteria that may be on the seed)
I only soak for 12 hours tho and keep it somewhere warm around 70 degrees.
I then put them in a paper towel and once again keep them warm.
Usually sprouts withing 24 to 48 hours after that.
The only time I’ve ever had an issue with seeds not sprouting was two strains, and I believe it was the breeders fault and not of my own since others had the same issue. (Maybe the seeds were too fresh or too old..idk)

What would you consider “very warm” water to be, like almost steaming hot or? I wanna be sure before making something stupid haha. 70F doesn’t seem to be “that” warm, my room temperature is between 74-77F, that should be okay without any extra warmers?

xtsho
Well-Known Member

I just put them straight into soil, water them in, and leave them alone. I normally get 100% germination. Messing with paper towels and all that is a waste of time. By the time you germinate in paper towels and then plant in what you’re growing in a seed that was planted straight into soil is already developing the roots. You can do the paper towel method but it’s not necessary.

Kingrow1
Well-Known Member

Holy cow. Paper towel, h2o2, water temps, best methods.

The best method is straight to the medium you are using as by default the most important aspect would be colinization of root from bacteria and fungi.

Once you master this lets talk a 12-24 hour soak as the whole paper towel thing is ameture’ish imo. Im pretty certain once the seed is 100% hydrated it is at 100% max growth, soaking just speeds up hydration and past that i can see no futher benefits to keeping it in a paper towel over its new home.

Some may see different but in all ways the soak and plant is the quickest.

Mj isnt really that temp dependant so any water and any temp so long as its .either too hot or cold. For paper towels natural unbleached type, hemp if ylu think that makes you even more supercool.

I use the soak to get more precise timimgs and suggest there is no rush until you have everything down

Kingrow1
Well-Known Member

I just put them straight into soil, water them in, and leave them alone. I normally get 100% germination. Messing with paper towels and all that is a waste of time. By the time you germinate in paper towels and then plant in what you’re growing in a seed that was planted straight into soil is already developing the roots. You can do the paper towel method but it’s not necessary.

Little things like those leaf curls and serrations pointing up or down pissed me off about flourescents and such lights in general. Did i find more light made for less of that idk but felt that way at the time

Aotea Med_Men
New Member

What would you consider “very warm” water to be, like almost steaming hot or? I wanna be sure before making something stupid haha. 70F doesn’t seem to be “that” warm, my room temperature is between 74-77F, that should be okay without any extra warmers?

Hot water cylinder?

xtsho
Well-Known Member

Little things like those leaf curls and serrations pointing up or down pissed me off about flourescents and such lights in general. Did i find more light made for less of that idk but felt that way at the time

I don’t even pay attention to a little curling when seedlings are this young. They grow out of it and a week from now you won’t even know. Too many people obsess when the plants leaves are not perfect and start trying to fix something that will resolve itself. I just leave them alone and let them grow. I germinate many seeds from many different plants. All of them at times will have weird looking leaves sometimes. In the end they all grow just fine. But that’s probably because I don’t freak out and start dumping stuff on them, worrying about runoff pH, spraying with CalMag, etc.

See also  Pulling Weeds And Planting Seeds

Cannabis is an easy to grow plant. There is absolutely no need to do anything special to get it to grow. I start my seeds the same way I do with tomatoes, peppers, squash, cucumbers, flowers, etc. I put the seed in some dirt and give it a little water. Keep it in a reasonably warm location. No need for paper towels, heat mats, domes, etc. I know you know that. But too many others don’t and follow some convoluted process for starting seeds.

The Effect of Light on Germination and Seedlings

Do seeds need light to germinate? And how does light affect the germination of seeds? T&M’s former Technical Manager, David Batty, investigates these questions and discusses the question of whether seedlings need light. Some plants germinate well in darkness, some prefer continuous light, and others have no preference either way.

Apparently it was custom in Ancient Egypt, before finally sealing the tomb, to leave a little pile of moistened corn near the sarcophagus. One can imagine the seed germinating in the pitch darkness, stretching itself upward feeling for light which was not there and finally toppling over having exhausted its food reserves.

It is a fact of life that most plants need light to grow and keep them healthy, but not all plants need light to germinate, and, as we shall see, some seeds find light a hindrance. If we look at the matter from the gardener’s point of view, however, we can use the rule of thumb that most cultivated plants on sale in seed form prefer to germinate in the dark. There are some notable exceptions however, some greenhouse perennials, epiphytes, many grasses, and even tobacco all prefer light and a large number of seeds are not fussy either way.

The reason is that commercially produced seed is bred and selected for its ease of germination as well as other more obvious characteristics and so peculiarities such as light or dark requirements do not often occur. On the other hand seed which is obtained non-commercially, in small quantities from the home gardener, seed lists, or the more unusual items from seed merchants may prove to be much more fussy in its requirements. In fact, research has shown that with seeds other than cultivated forms there is a great deal of variation. We can divide seeds of this type into those which germinate only in the dark, those which germinate only in continuous light, those which germinate after being given only a brief amount of light and those which germinate just as happily in light or darkness.

As long ago as 1926 experiments were carried out by Kinzel to find out the light requirements of hundreds of plant species. He found about 270 species which germinated at or above 20°C (60°F) in light, and 114 species germinated at the same temperature in the dark. He also found 190 species which germinate in light after experiencing hard frosts and 81 species likewise germinated in the dark. Fifty-two species germinated in the light and 32 species in the dark after light frosting and finally there were 33 species which were unaffected by light or dark.

Unfortunately, as with all gardening matters, things are not quite this simple. Other factors, it seems, can also affect the seed’s light requirements, for example, with some species (e.g. Salvia pratensisand Saxifraga caespitosa) light requirement only exists immediately after harvesting whereas with Salvia verticillata and Apium graveolens (Celery) this lasts for a year and to confuse matters further other species develop a light requirement while in storage. Chemicals also, such as nitrates in the soil, can substitute for light in stimulating seeds to germinate so that some light requiring seeds will still germinate if covered with fertile soil. Still it all makes for interesting gardening doesn’t it?

For a fairly comprehensive list of the Light/Dark requirements of seeds we refer you to Thompson & Morgan’s booklet ‘The Seed Sowing Guide’, which they will be pleased to send you for only 99p if you drop them a line. This is a helpful general guide but it is worth remembering that not all seeds in the same genus behave in the same way. For example Primula ohconia needs light and Primula spectablis needs darkness for germination, so there is still a lot to learn, much of which can only be gained by personal experience and sharing that information gained with others.

The explanation of how light affects some seeds and causes them to be in a state of readiness for germination and yet prevents other seeds if necessary from germinating is highly complex. Suffice it to say that it is mainly the light’s effect upon a plant pigment called phytochrome within the seed. This relates to the type of light which the seed receives. As a generalisation, light in the red wave length usually promotes germination whereas blue light inhibits it.

See also  Pineapple Express Weed Seeds

In a practical vein the light requirements of a seed may relate to the habitat in which the seed parent usually grows, so as to ensure that those which fall in an area conducive to growth will germinate and those which fall in less salubrious circumstances bide their time. For example a seed requiring light to germinate might fall into the deep shade of another plant where growing conditions would be very poor, whereas a seed falling into an open, well lit space would germinate quickly and flourish. On the other hand, it may be essential for the establishment of the young seedling that part or all the seed needs to be covered with soil or in the shade, perhaps, to protect the young root.

In such a case with a seed which required darkness, uncovered seed, which is exposed to light will not germinate. Sometimes only part of the seed is light sensitive. Phacelia is light sensitive at only two points on its surface and in a lettuce at only one. The micropyle where the water is absorbed, is light sensitive perhaps to ensure that only correctly oriented seed with the best chance of survival germinates.

Of course, the effect of light on seeds should not be over emphasised, no real hard and fast rules can be laid down, as other factors interact with light. To the gardener, the two questions he needs to have answered are ‘How deep should I sow my seed?’ and ‘Should I cover the seed tray to exclude light or not?’

In answer to the first question, depth of sowing depends a lot upon the size of the seed. Very tiny seed should normally be sown and left uncovered. Small seed which needs light will usually receive it even if you cover it with a light sprinkling of compost or vermiculite because light does travel a short distance through the soil and with some seeds exposure does not need to be long or continuous. For example tobacco seed receives all the light it needs to germinate, after it has taken up water, in 0.01 seconds of sunlight and even moonlight will do!

It is not just the very tiny seeds which sometimes need light to germinate, an average seed like Impatiens is light sensitive too and should be covered with a fine sprinkling of vermiculite after sowing and left in diffused light, placed in polythene to provide a high humidity until germination which usually takes 10-14 days at 21-42°C (70-75°F).

Medium sized seeds and upward, unless they have a light requirements (and we do not know of any really large seeds which do) should generally be sown just below the surface, enclosed in a polythene bag or cling film and placed in diffused light.

Some, but not all, popular seeds which prefer light for germination are:

Providing artificial light should not normally be necessary for seeds sown in greenhouses, well lit propagators etc. but if light is a problem or, more importantly, if you want to ensure rapid, healthy growth of your seedlings after germination then some form of additional light may be necessary. This would particularly be the case in raising seeds early in the season and quite a number of flower and vegetable seedlings respond to supplementary light. For example, tomatoes and cucumbers where vigour and earliness have been improved, also Antirrhinum, Stocks, Gerbera, Gloxinia and Gesnaria have all responded with a higher growth rate when given extra light in the winter months.

Tuberous begonias when sown in late winter must have supplementary lighting if they are to develop properly. They are sensitive to day length and when this is less than 12 hours they form tubers instead of making vegetative growth. In order, therefore to produce healthy young plants lighting must be given to extended the day lengths to more than 12 hours.

To provide this light, fluorescent tubes of the Gro-Lux type, to give light something akin to sunlight should be used, suspended around 2 feet (60cm) above the seedlings. As there will be so much moisture about use only approved horticultural fittings when installing the lights and fit a time clock if possible so that the lights can be on for 12 hours each day.

David Batty is a former Technical Manager at Thompson and Morgan Seeds, where he looked after the seed-testing laboratories.

Source of article
Growing From Seed – Spring 1989 Vol. 3 Number 2
Copyright: The Seed Raising Journal from Thompson & Morgan