Can Good Weed Have Seeds

The use of high-quality seeds is one of the key requirements for growing healthy cannabis plants. It is true that the final yield depends on numerous factors including adequate watering, availability of nutrients, and good light quality. However, it all starts with superior genetics. In order to ensure that you receive the exact genetics you […] How To: Spot Top-Shelf Quality Cannabis How else would you know if that avocado is ripe enough without examining it closely or giving it a good squeeze… you know getting your senses involved. The Seed-to-Sale (Metrc) OMMA uses Metrc for the statewide seed-to-sale inventory tracking system. All OMMA-licensed businesses must be fully Metrc-compliant. Quick Links Information for

Things to know about cannabis seed quality before growing

The use of high-quality seeds is one of the key requirements for growing healthy cannabis plants. It is true that the final yield depends on numerous factors including adequate watering, availability of nutrients, and good light quality. However, it all starts with superior genetics. In order to ensure that you receive the exact genetics you…

The use of high-quality seeds is one of the key requirements for growing healthy cannabis plants. It is true that the final yield depends on numerous factors including adequate watering, availability of nutrients, and good light quality. However, it all starts with superior genetics. In order to ensure that you receive the exact genetics you are looking for, it is important for you to source high-quality cannabis seeds. This will not only provide you the cannabinoid and terpene profiles you desire but will also help get rid of dud seeds.

According to information from i49 , an authentic cannabis seed bank, there are several factors to be examined and evaluated while purchasing seeds. There are certain signs that clearly indicate whether the seed is worth all the effort and hard work or not. Mentioned below are some of these factors.

Feel and Appearance : One of the easiest ways to evaluate the traits and quality of cannabis seed is to get accustomed to their appearance. In general, the outer shells of genetically superior and healthier seeds tend to have darker shades. One of the most obvious signs of some good seeds is grey and black shades with the occasional display of a tiger stripe. The appearance of healthy seeds will also resemble a wax coating on the shell surface, particularly when exposed to bright light.

In addition to a darker shade, better-quality seeds are quite firm and do not bend or break when squeezed between the thumb and index finger. On the other hand, old or poor quality seeds crack and crumble easily under pressure. Please remember that these seeds are nothing but pods of plant genetics. Over a period of time, they get aged and are no longer fit for use. Therefore, do not waste your time on seeds that are past their prime.

You should also avoid using seeds that are immature and young because they are unlikely to germinate. Even if they do, it will take much longer. These seeds can be identified by their green and white appearance.

Avoid Seeds from a Bag : You may consider yourself lucky to find some seeds in your cannabis bag. However, these seeds are not good for a number of reasons. Firstly, this is an indication that the grower has messed up and allowed an invading male to pollinate the female plants. Once pollinated, the female plants shift their focus entirely towards producing seeds and stop producing THC-containing resin. Moreover, the seeds also add to the bag’s overall weight. This certainly means less weed for your money.

See also  How Long Does It Take To Grow Weed From Seed

Germinate the Seed : One of the best ways to evaluate the genetic potential of cannabis seeds is to simply put them in the soil. You will see the result within a very short time. This option is ideally suited for home growers with adequate time and space to spare. However, this may not be a suitable alternative for commercial growers.

Proper Sourcing : Without any doubt, the most trustworthy source to find great seeds is a reputable seed bank . These organizations have excellent breeding skills and are known to deliver exactly what they advertise to their customers. Many of these seed banks have an excellent reputation in the market.

Float Test : If you are not satisfied after analyzing the appearance and toughness of the seeds and still have doubts about seed quality, carry out the float test. Fill up a glass jar or drinking glass with water and place the seeds on the surface. Seeds that remain floating on the water surface are likely to be of poor quality. On the other hand, healthier seeds will sink to the bottom.

Be patient while conducting the float test because the result may not be seen immediately. Some high-quality seeds need time to absorb enough water and sink to the bottom of the container. Therefore, before confirming the results, you must wait for 1-2 hours.

How To: Spot Top-Shelf Quality Cannabis

How else would you know if that avocado is ripe enough without examining it closely or giving it a good squeeze… you know getting your senses involved. The same applies to weed. You need to get your senses involved. That’s one of the reasons we hate the new trend of putting weed in glass jar tin cans. They don’t allow you to examine the weed before purchasing it. But that’s another discussion for another day.

A guide to ensuring you’re not getting jerked + actually are getting top-shelf cannabis:

Smell it.

You never want your weed to have a grassy, hay smell or smell of ammonia. That’s an instant sign of some low-quality bud. Either it wasn’t dried properly, cured properly or a mixture of both. Always looks for some type of a distinct smell — pungent, citrus-y, pine-y, diesel. Something that is pleasing to the nose. Make sure it doesn’t smell like chemicals. How would you know? You’d be able to tell. Chemicals hit the nose in an unnatural way. There’s a big difference between the smell of a diesel, pungent aroma vs. a chemical aroma. If the smell makes you go ‘mmmm…’, you should be straight.

Examine it.

Cannabis is a plant. It should look pretty. Is it heavy in trichomes? Trichomes are those tiny little crystals that usually cover the bud. They tend to be shiny, sticky + always carry the most amazing aromas. If the bud isn’t covered in a blanket of frost, it’s not it. Has it been trimmed properly? Weed that hasn’t been properly trimmed are usually signs of a rushed job. If they’re cutting corners on manicuring the weed for bag appeal, where else did they cut corners? Does it contain any seeds? Top-shelf bud should be sinsemilla—it should never contain seeds. If you find a seed, that just means some issues came about during its growth cycle, but it shouldn’t be too big of an issue. If you find a seed in a strain you like, save it. If you find multiple seeds, that’s a major red flag that the bud is not high quality.

See also  Grass Seed Without Weeds
Touch it.

You may not always get to touch the bud, but when you do check for freshness + density. You never want bud that feels a bit too moist or too dry where it’s crumbling. The former could mean it wasn’t properly dried and the latter could mean it hasn’t been properly stored. Always opt for buds that are sticky to the touch with a bit of weight. Some strains are light + airy, while others are denser. The main thing to look out for is a bud that’s too light or too airy. That is a sign of not receiving enough light during the flowering phase resulting in a less potent bud.

Is the price reasonable or too good to be true?

In New York City, an eighth of quality bud can cost anywhere from $50-$75. From your local dealer, $40 is a reasonable deal. If you’re paying less than $40 for an eighth, you’re more than likely getting some mids. Be wary of $25 eighths. While it’s definitely smokable, there’s probably something wrong with it in terms of overall quality—not potent enough, wasn’t cured properly, dried out, etc. If you’re paying more than $60 + it’s in a branded bag, find a new person. Don’t waste your time on whatever Gelato they just put in a branded bag.

Did we miss anything?
Got tips to add to this list? Let us know.

Affiliate Disclosure: SMK BRK may be an affiliate for products we recommend. If you buy those items through our links, we may earn a commission. You will never pay more when buying a product through our link. We only recommend products that we use and are genuinely interested in.

Seed-to-Sale (Metrc)

OMMA uses Metrc for the statewide seed-to-sale inventory tracking system. All OMMA-licensed businesses must be fully Metrc-compliant.

Quick Links

  • Information for All Commercial Licensees
  • Information for Dispensaries
  • Getting Started
  • Required and Optional Training
  • Monthly Reporting
  • Zero Inventory
  • FAQs
  • Important Dates
  • Contact OMMA or Metrc
  • Agreed Order (Court Document)
  • NCS Analytics
  • Pay My Fine
  • OMMA-Metrc News and Updates

All Commercial Licensees

EVERY commercial licensee must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline for full compliance was May 26.

ALL seeds, plants and products must be tagged and tracked in Metrc, except for dispensaries selling or transferring untagged products (see more in the Dispensaries section below).

Every licensee must be registered with Metrc. The owner or key administrator must have completed the New Business training offered every weekday and on-demand in Metrc Learn.

Once credentialed, licensees log in and access the Support page to find on-demand, self-paced learning modules for additional training.

See also  Weed Control Seed

Dispensaries

Like all commercial licensees, dispensaries must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline was May 26.

Dispensaries may not buy new untagged inventory. Dispensaries have through Aug. 24 to sell or legally dispose of untagged items that were in the dispensary’s inventory on May 26.

Transporters may transport a dispensary’s untagged inventory to waste disposal facilities, and waste disposal facilities can legally dispose of the untagged inventory. The untagged inventory must picked up, or have arrangements made for it to be picked up, on or before Aug. 24.

Dispensaries can conduct untagged sales from May 27 through Aug. 24. Untagged sales will need to be accounted for as described in the Monthly Reporting section.

If your dispensary purchased a Metrc-tagged product that was tested “outside” of Metrc, which means the lab did not input the results directly into Metrc, there is no deadline to sell it as long as the lab entered information into Metrc’s “Notes” section about the testing laboratory, the sample number the tests passed. Once a Metrc-tagged package has been transferred or sold to a dispensary, it does not need to be tested again as long as that information is in the notes.

Getting Started

To begin using Metrc, sign up for training to get credentialed. See more in the Required and Optional Training section below.

Required and Optional Training

Required Training

The owner or key administrator of each commercial license is required to take Metrc’s New Business class to become credentialed in Metrc.

Licensees can use the Metrc scheduler to sign up for New Business training, offered each weekday. The class is also offered on demand through Metrc Learn in your Metrc account.

When you complete the training, reach out to Metrc’s Support team to get credentialed.

Optional Training

OMMA and Metrc hosted free educational seminars May 3-6 for growers, processors, dispensaries, transporters and waste facilities, and May 17-18 for testing laboratories.

The seminars were held in-person in Oklahoma City and streamed online. Recordings of one seminar each are posted to YouTube for growers, processors, dispensaries, transporters and waste facilities, and testing laboratories.

Other Optional Training

Metrc offers other advanced training courses on Metrc Learn and on its scheduler. Metrc also has training videos on its Oklahoma web page and its YouTube channel on the following topics (and many others):

Monthly Reporting

Dispensaries must continue using the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template for any untagged sales and waste disposal through Aug. 24.

Metrc will meet the monthly reporting requirements and the template is no longer necessary for all tagged sales, transports and waste disposal after May 31.

Businesses reporting zero inventory will need to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc.

All commercial licensees were required to continue all monthly reporting using the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template for activity through May 31. The last template with activity through May 31 was due June 15.

Zero Inventory

Businesses with zero inventory must still be credentialed in Metrc. Until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc, the business needs to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system.

For a comprehensive list of frequently asked questions, please view this searchable PDF.