Best Weed And Seed

When your lawn falls short of your expectations despite all the hard work you put into it, don’t blame yourself. It’s not you, it’s the lawn. Luckily, We've rounded up the best weed killers and preventers, including natural weed killers and treatments for lawns, flower beds, and vegetable gardens. Plus, expert tips from plant and lawn care pros on what to look for in a weed killer. You could save time and energy by using a weed and feed product to fertilize and maintain a beautiful lawn.

7 Best Weed and Feed Reviews – Give Your Lawn A Professional Look The Easy Way

When your lawn falls short of your expectations despite all the hard work you put into it, don’t blame yourself. It’s not you, it’s the lawn. Luckily, lawn problems, no matter how serious, are usually easy to fix with the right tools. This is not about working harder, but working smarter.

From weeds to yellow spots and barren patches, lawn problems can be a real headache. Not only does a meticulous lawn enhance your curb appeal, but it also gives you bragging rights in the neighborhood.

But as we all know, it’s not easy to keep your lawn looking its best every day all year round. The grass looks pale and sickly. Clumps of weed are sprouting everywhere, and heavy foot traffic has all but flattened the turfgrass. It looks like you’re in need of a double-action product that kills the weeds while feeding the grass at the same time.

Weed and Feed products do just that. They eliminate various types of weeds from your lawn and offer your grass the nutrients they need. Here we review the top weed and feed products in the market detailing their advantages and drawbacks. We follow that with a comprehensive buying guide to help you choose the right product for your specific lawn needs.

Best Weed and Feed Reviews

Whether your lawn has bare spots, yellow grass, or a weed infestation, the following weed and feed fertilizers offer answers to your lawn problems. You’ll be able to weed-proof your lawn while feeding your turfgrass with minimal effort.

1. GreenView Fairway Formula Fertilizer (Editor’s Choice)

We start off with the best of the pack. If you don’t have either the time or patience to keep the weeds on your lawn in check and take care of the feeding of the grass, then GreenView Fairway Formula Fertilizer might be what you’re looking for. This pro-grade fertilizer makes it easy to achieve a professional lawn appearance without putting in too much work.

What makes this fertilizer and weed-killer combo stand out is the wide range of weeds it targets. It focuses specifically on difficult lawn weeds such as crabgrass. Not only does it kill this lawn bane, but it blocks it from returning. People who had to struggle with crabgrass in the past know how stubborn this weed is and how it often comes back the next spring. So it’s a plus point for this product with its proprietary formula that it keeps crabgrass from invading your lawn after applying it.

Not only does GreenView eliminate crabgrass but it’s also effective against over 200 other weeds including the pesky dandelions. But that’s only half the story. Since we’re talking about weed and feed fertilizers, then the feeding part is just as important as killing and blocking weeds.

Greenview uses a 65 percent slow-release formula that’s high on nitrogen to feed the grass for up to 12 weeks after each application. The 24-0-6 formula is suitable for many turfgrass varieties as long as the roots are established in the soil.

On the downside, you need to watch out for young grass on the lawn. The high concentration of nitrogen in the fertilizer could burn the tender roots of yet-to-establish turfgrass. If you have grass varieties that are sensitive to nitrogen such as Saint Augustine or dichondra grass, you shouldn’t use this fertilizer.

  • Blocks crabgrass.
  • Effective against 200 weeds.
  • Proprietary 65 percent slow-release formula.
  • Covers 5,000 square feet.
  • Not suitable for sensitive turfgrass.
  • Needs heavier application to fight off clovers.

2. Scotts Liquid Turf Builder (Best Value)

Let’s face it. The main reason you’re using a weed and feed fertilizer is that you don’t have time to deal with weed infestation while also feeding the grass. I get it. It’s a lot of work. So when a product like Scotts Liquid Turf Builder comes in a nifty easy-to-use bottle with a hose, you know you’re in for a treat. All you have to do is point the nozzle and spray the liquid. It doesn’t get any easier than that.

This product kills a wide range of weeds that attack lawns both in the northern and southern parts of the country. This list includes pigweed, buckhorn, ragweed, chickweed, ground ivy, plantain, henbit, spurge, knotweed, oxalis, lambsquarters, and poison ivy. It also does a good job taking care of dandelions and clover.

As a post-emergent pesticide, Liquid Turf Builder is more efficient against weeds already growing on your lawn. It doesn’t prevent them from starting or stop them from coming back. So you’ll need to use it whenever you see weeds emerging among the turfgrass. The sooner you apply it the better results you get. With some stubborn weeds, especially clover, you might need to use another application about 3 weeks after the first one.

The container covers an area of about 6,000 square feet giving you the best value for your money. It has a custom 25-0-2 formula with a high concentration of nitrogen, zero phosphorus, and trace amounts of potassium.

Using this product is both safe and convenient. However, it has a major downside. It doesn’t work against crabgrass, either in pre-emergent or post-emergent capacities. That’s a major disadvantage and if you have crabgrass on your lawn, you’ll have to look for another product on this list.

  • Covers 6,000 square feet.
  • Effective against growing broadleaf weeds.
  • Good value for money.
  • Doesn’t kill crabgrass.
  • Doesn’t work as a pre-emergent pesticide.

3. Bioadvanced All in One

We all know how tough it is to get rid of crabgrass. I’m not just talking about keeping it off the lawn, but actually killing the growing weed after it has taken root. So one of the criteria that separate a top-notch weed and feed fertilizer from the rest of the pack is its ability to attack crabgrass after emerging and eliminating it. In that respect, Bioadvanced All in One delivers in spades.

After it takes care of crabgrass, it turns to dandelions, chickweed, clover, spotted spurge. It shows satisfying results eliminating a long list of over 200 types of weeds. So you can use it as a post-emergent pesticide. However, it doesn’t block crabgrass from returning to the lawn. You’ll need to apply it whenever you spot emerging weeds.

In addition to its weed killing qualities, Bioadvanced uses a proprietary technology called micro-feed action that unlocked nutrients in the soil while also improving nutrient uptake.

This product is suitable for Northern turfgrass including, Fescue, Seashore Paspalum, Zoysia grass, Buffalo grass, Kentucky Bluegrass, and Ryegrass. The package protects and feeds about 5,000 square feet.

On the downside, you cannot use this product with other types of turfgrass. Also, when applied to Bermudagrass, you might notice the grass turning yellow. It will take up to a week for the grass to regain its lush green color.

  • Kill crabgrass after emerging.
  • Effective against 200 types of weed.
  • Easy to spread and use.
  • Micro-feed action.
  • Causes Bermudagrass discoloration.
  • Limited to only Northern turfgrass.

4. Scotts Turf Builder Southern Triple Action

Scotts is an established brand in the world of weed killers and fertilizers. So when the Scotts Turf Builder Southern Triple Action package arrived at my door, I already had high expectations for it. And I have to say I wasn’t disappointed. The Triple Action delivered on all three fronts as advertised. I had a tough time keeping dollar weeds and oxalis off my lawn but one application in the early spring of this weed and feed was enough to eliminate these stubborn weeds. I still applied it again later that spring just to be on the safe side.

With a decent coverage rate of 4,000 square feet, this product is safe to use with many Southern turfgrass varieties. It works well on Zoysia grass, carpet grass, centipede grass, and Saint Augustine grass.

On the downside, you can only apply it in the spring with temperature in the mid-seventies. The formula doesn’t work in cold temperatures. Also, it’s not safe to apply it on newly mowed grass or tender grass that hasn’t established in the soil yet. After spraying, you should keep pets and children away from the lawn for at least one day until the pesticide has dissipated.

Although it works well as a pre-emergent pesticide, Scotts will not have much success against crabgrass once it takes root in the lawn. That’s the main drawback that kept it from contending for the top place on this list.

  • Works well against growing broadleaf weeds.
  • Suitable for Southern turfgrass.
  • Covers 4,000 square feet.
  • Not safe to use on newly seeded areas.
  • Doesn’t kill growing crabgrass.

5. Pennington UltraGreen

As we have seen so far, some weed and feed fertilizers work only on northern grass while others specialize in Southern turfgrass varieties. But what if you want to use a product that works on all types of turfgrass? Pennington UltraGreen is that kind of product that handles a wide variety of weeds as well as grass types.

Its ability to aggressively go after over 250 types of weeds is impressive. You can use it against anything from dandelions and dollar weed to henbits, plantain, chickweed, and white clover. The conveniently resealable package offers protection to an area of 5,000 square feet.

One thing to watch out for with the UltraGreen is its high concentration of nitrogen. With a 10.5 percent slow-release nitrogen in a 30-0-4 formula, it has the highest nitrogen ratio among the products on this list. So use it with caution on sensitive turfgrass and make sure the roots are well established in the soil before you apply the fertilizer. It could burn tender shoots of grass and sensitive roots.

Another drawback about this product is that you can only use it in the late spring when the temperature is between 60 degrees to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Also, it doesn’t work against crabgrass.

And while it advertises its suitability for Northern as well as Southern turfgrass, you should not use this product with Saint Augustine grass. The extra nitrogen in the ingredients would burn the grass or at least stunt its growth.

  • Suitable for Northern and Southern turfgrass varieties.
  • Covers 5,000 square feet.
  • Effective against 250 types of broadleaf weed.
  • Not good against crabgrass.
  • Not suitable for Saint Augustine grass.

6. Preen 2164169 One LawnCare

While using weed and feed fertilizers, you need to be wary of the timing of the applications. Not only are you targeting pesky weeds, but you’re also feeding the grass with every application. In other words, you can’t just use it any time of the year since you might trigger growth in dormant grass in the fall or winter which has devastating consequences. But with Preen 2164169, you don’t have to worry about that.

Preen is safe to use three out of four seasons. You can use it in the spring, summer, and fall. Furthermore, you can use it to fight off fully grown crabgrass. This is what makes Preen stand out among other weed and feeds. It is still effective against crabgrass that’s about 4 weeks old. So you can use it as both a pre-emergent and a post-emergent weed killer.

But it’s not just crabgrass and dandelions. Preen shows satisfying results eliminating more than 250 types of broadleaf weeds on the lawn. This includes white clover, a notoriously difficult weed to manage once it takes root on your lawn.

The slow-release formula allows this fertilizer to keep feeding your grass for up to 8 weeks after each application. It has a custom 24-0-6 formula with zero phosphorus and covers over 5,000 square feet of lawn offering both nutrition and protection.

That said, you shouldn’t use this product if you have carpet grass, colonial bentgrass, Saint Augustine grass, or dichondra. The high concentrations of nitrogen could cause injury to the turfgrass.

  • Can be used any time of the year except in winter.
  • Eliminates crabgrass 4 weeks after emergence.
  • Zero phosphorus formula.
  • Effective against 250 types of weed.
  • A little pricey.
  • Requires more than one application to get rid of clover.

7. Jonathan Green Green-Up

A newcomer to the world of weed and feed, Jonathan Green Green-Up is already getting the attention of gardeners and homeowners. Its claim to fame is its focus on crabgrass. Not only does it aggressively eliminate growing crabgrass, but it also blocks it from returning to the lawn. So it works well both as a pre-emergence and a post-emergence herbicide.

Helping Green-Up perform is a new proprietary technology called dimension Crabgrass control. It targets crabgrass in the lawn and effectively kills the invasive weed without affecting the turfgrass or other vegetation in its vicinity. You can use this product on crabgrass already growing.

This is something that sets it apart from other weed and feeds on this list. Usually, after crabgrass has reached a certain maturity, weed killers become less effective. But Green-Up can be used on crabgrass 4 weeks later than other pesticides. Applying it isn’t limited to spring the way it is with other brands. You can use it all season without having undesirable side effects on the soil or the turfgrass.

Along with crabgrass, this weed killer also eliminates other broadleaf weeds including spurge, bittercress, henbit, and chickweed among others. The package covers 5,000 square feet of the lawn both protecting and feeding in the turfgrass. And on the feeding side, the new formula has 25 percent slow-release nitrogen, doesn’t have any phosphorus, and is non-staining.

On the downside, you’ll have to wait for 4 months after applying the weed killer before you can seed the lawn. This limits your options when choosing the right time to apply the weedkiller.

  • Targets crabgrass before and after emergence.
  • Eliminates crabgrass 4 weeks later than other similar products.
  • Protects and feeds 5,000 square feet.
  • Need to wait 4 months after application to seed the lawn.
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Weed and Feed Buying Guide

After this comprehensive review of the most popular weed and feed fertilizers in the market, let’s take a look at common lawn problems, the different types of fertilizers, and the best times to fertilize your lawn and apply weed and feed products.

Common Lawn Problems

Crabgrass and invasive weeds are not the only problems you might have to deal with on your lawn. Even a well-maintained lawn is prone to yellowing problems due to compact soil, poor soil, inadequate watering, excessive heat in the summer, or frost in the fall and winter.

Pests might also attack your turfgrass. White grubs, billbugs, and cranberry girdlers are common pests that feed on the grass and weaken its root system, creating yellow spots all over the lawn. You can use GreenView to tackle most of these problems including weak or mal-nourished grass.

Another problem you have to watch out for is fungi. Necrotic ring fungus is a hard infection to treat. It creates yellow rings in the lawn that can stay for three years. You’ll often have to turn up the soil, uproot the infected grass, and reseed the lawn.

Spilled chemicals can have a devastating impact on the soil and the quality of the grass as well. Whether it’s gasoline from your vehicle or pet urine, the roots of the grass are no match to the high concentrations of ammonia and gasoline in the soil. To solve this problem you’ll have to dig up the contaminated soil, supply fresh soil, and reseed the bare patches.

Check the Soil

Before you seed your lawn, you should take the necessary steps to test the soil to make sure the turfgrass you chose will actually grow on the lawn. Soil testing not only measures the presence of different nutrients in the soil but also the pH levels. To start with you need to make sure there’s a good balance of the three main nutrients, nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus in the soil. Grass often needs more nitrogen than potassium and it just requires trace amounts of phosphorus in the soil.

You can use a pH meter to check the acidity levels of the soil and add coarse sand or perlite to adjust these levels.

On top of that, you need to test the soil’s texture and drainage. Almost all types of turfgrass need a well-drained and loamy soil. Loamy soil has more silt and sand than clay which improves its drainage. To check that your soil has the right texture, fill the palm of your hand with soil and close your hand tightly. If the soil turns into a clump in your hand then it needs more perlite and sand.

Check the soil drainage in your lawn by digging a hole a few inches deep. Fill the hole with water and see how fast the water disappears. If it takes a long time for the soil to absorb the water, then your lawn is not well-drained. Fix that problem by adding organic material and coarse sand.

Types of Weed and Feed

When selecting the best weed and feed fertilizer for your lawn, you often have to make a choice between the two main types, liquid or granular. Each has its advantages and drawbacks.

  • Liquid: You will often use liquid weed and feed if you have a small lawn or backyard. It is often easier and more convenient to apply than granular products. The container often has concentrated liquid and you’ll need to connect it to your garden hose and start spraying. The whole process can take no more than a half-hour to cover your lawn. Some products such as Scotts Liquid Turf Builder have a lower risk of burning the grass since you can adjust the water flow as well as the concentration of the fertilizer according to your needs.
  • Granular: If you have a large lawn, then granular weed and feeds are a better option. You load the spreader with the fertilizer and criss-cross the lawn until you’re done. There’s less risk of spillage or stains with granular fertilizers. GreenView is an excellent example of this type. It doesn’t require diluting or mixing with water which makes it less messy. This is the recommended type for lawns larger than a quarter acre but less than one acre.

Best Times to Fertilize the Lawn

When it comes to fertilizing your lawn, timing is of the essence. While some weed and feeds are limited to the early spring in warm climates and late spring in cold ones, other products can be applied all season without time limitations. In general, you should wait for the air temperature to go above 55 degrees Fahrenheit before you apply the fertilizer.

Ideally, from mid-April onwards is the right time to fertilize your lawn for most parts of the United States. Always pick a warm day and avoid applying weed and feed on rainy days or during strong winds. This could blow away the granules of fertilizer or steer them to where you least want them.

After the first application in mid-April, you’ll need to follow up with another in Mid-may. Depending on the soil quality you will need to apply the weed and feed between six to eight weeks throughout the summer and mid-fall. If you notice weeds emerging in your lawn between applications, you can use the weed and feed in a more focused fashion on the infected areas.

Between October and April, you should hold back the fertilizer. Dormant grass doesn’t need fertilizing since it could trigger new growth during the cold winter.

Weed and Feed FAQs

If you’re new to using weed and feed, you might still have some unanswered questions. Here we answer the most common questions.

How does Weed and Feed work?

The way weed and feed products approach killing weed depends on the type of weed these products target. Generally speaking, there are two types of weeds that attack your lawn. The first is broadleaf weeds such as clover, dandelions, ground ivy, and others. Weed and feed brands such as Scotts and Preen would often attach the herbicide to the leaves and roots of the weeds in the first phase of the process.

The second type of weed is crabgrass which is very common and harder to get rid of. Weed and feed brands such as BioAdvanced and GreenView do a good job of eliminating this stubborn weed. Usually, they add a second phase that targets narrow leaf weeds. You might need to use more than one application to fully remove crabgrass and other narrow-leaf weeds from your lawn.

The final phase of the weed and feed process is the feeding part. While the product is killing the weed, your grass also gets valuable nutrients and plant food supplements that give the lawn a lush green look. Most products are high in nitrogen and low in potassium with zero content of phosphorus. That’s the right nutrient formula that your grass needs. However since some products have a higher concentration of nitrogen than others, you need to read the instructions carefully to apply the fertilizer in the right dosage.

How do I apply Weed and Feed?

Since there are two types of weed and feed, how you apply the fertilizer depends on the type you choose. Granular types such as BioAdvance and GreenView would usually require you to use a spreader. This helps you spread the fertilizer evenly across the lawn and prevent damage to the turfgrass. Even if you have a small lawn, resist the temptation to use your hands to spread the material. Many good lawns were ruined when clumps of fertilizer landed on certain spots while other areas remained untouched.

If your lawn is too small (less than a quarter acre) for a spreader, you might opt for a liquid weed and feed such as Scotts Liquid Turf Builder. It’s easy to use and only requires you to connect the container to a garden hose. Turn on the water and aim the nozzle at the lawn. When you’re done, release the handle and turn off the water. This is usually the easiest way to apply this type of liquid fertilizer.

There are other liquid products that require a more elaborate way of mixing the concentrated material with water before you can apply. We didn’t review these products since they’re a lot of hassle and can be messy to mix and apply.

How many Weed and Feed applications do I need?

The number of applications of weed and feed on your lawn depends on the type of turfgrass you have and the weed infestation. But in general, the first application in early or late spring (depending on the climate) is a good starter to nourish the grass at the beginning of the growing cycle. This early application also takes care of the sprouting weeds that could take advantage of the warming temperatures and the rainfall to spread across the lawn.

In most cases, you’ll need to apply weed and feed at least once every two months between April and October every year. If you need to fight emerging weeds between applications, then aim for a concentrated application that targets only the infested areas in the lawn.

The Last Word

We have taken a whirlwind tour of the most popular weed and feed products available online. We covered the good points and drawbacks of each product then detailed the main features to look for when buying a weed and feed fertilizer for your lawn.

After this exhaustive guide of weed and feed fertilizers, we recommend GreenView Fairway Formula Fertilizer. As both a pre-emergent and post-emergent herbicide, It does a good job eliminating crabgrass from your lawn and blocking it from coming back. The granular type product doesn’t stain and is easy to apply using a spreader. The package covers 5,000 square feet which is more than enough for most average-sized lawns. The product has a 65 percent slow-release formula that will feed the grass for weeks after each application.

If you’re on a budget, we recommend Scotts Liquid Turf Builder. The liquid fertilizer is easy to use and gives you a bang for your buck. The post-emergent herbicide works effectively against a wide variety of broadleaf weeds. It has an affordable price and one container protects and feeds about 6,000 square feet of the lawn.

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The 6 Best Weed Killers to Keep Your Lawn and Garden Tidy

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On This Page

  • Our Top Picks
  • Final Verdict
  • How to Shop for Weed Killers Like a Pro
  • Questions You Might Ask
  • Take Our Word for It

Weeds can be tough to contain. And if you can’t stand the thought of spending another hour tirelessly weeding your yard, it may be time to snag a store-bought weed killer. “If left unchecked, weeds can completely ruin a lawn,” says Gladys M-Curtis, Ph.D., plant scientist, who adds that these herbicides are “one of the faster options in weed control.”

To determine the best weed killers, we researched dozens of the most popular options, considering their active ingredients, effectiveness, and ease of use. We also paid attention to whether the products were designed to kill weeds, prevent weeds, or both. In addition to Dr. M-Curtis, we also spoke to Michael Augaitis, lawn care expert and owner of Florida Gardens Lawn and Shrub Care, and Stuart Mackenzie, horticulturist and expert at Trees.com, to learn more about how weed killers work, when to use them, and what to consider before buying them.

The first thing you should do before shopping for a weed killer is identify the types of weeds you have growing in your yard. Then, you can “determine your goal and use the information to select a weed killer,” says Dr. M-Curtis.

Our top pick, Scotts Turf Builder Triple Action, is a best-in-class option, thanks to its ability to kill and prevent specific weeds while fertilizing grass on your lawn.

Keep reading for more of the best weed killers and preventers on the market, plus expert tips for buying and using weed killers.

Our Top Picks

  • Best Overall Weed Killer:Scotts Turf Builder Triple Action
  • Best Natural Weed Killer:Green Gobbler 20% Vinegar Weed and Grass Killer
  • Best Weed Killer for Lawns:BioAdvanced All-in-One Lawn Weed Killer Concentrate
  • Best Weed Killer for Flower Beds:Roundup Landscape Weed Preventer
  • Best Weed Killer for Vegetable Gardens:Preen Natural Vegetable Garden Weed Preventer
  • Best Weed Killer for Patios:Spectracide Weed and Grass Killer With Extended Control Concentrate

Best Overall Weed Killer: Scotts Turf Builder Triple Action

Who it’s for: People who want a weed killer that also acts as a fertilizer.
Who it isn’t for: People who want to kill weeds on flower beds or vegetable gardens.

Scotts Turf Builder Triple Action earned the top spot on our list because it does more than the average weed killer. This product kills pesky lawn weeds and prevents unwanted grassy weeds from growing. And it does both of these things while fertilizing your lawn at the same time, eliminating the need for a separate fertilizer. This three-in-one approach sets it apart from other popular weed killers and preventers, making it a particularly convenient way to clean up your lawn. Although it’s important to note that this weed killer is intended for lawn care, not flower beds or gardens.

Since this is a selective weed killer, you don’t have to be precise when applying it. Instead, you can spread it across your lawn and trust it to kill specific weeds while preserving the grass you want. When used correctly, the so-called “weed and feed” will kill common weeds like dandelions, clover, chickweed, and more. It can also prevent grassy weeds, like crabgrass, from growing for up to four months (although it will not kill any existing crabgrass).

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Product Details:

  • Active Ingredients: Dicamba, pendimethalin, and 2,4-D
  • Pre-Emergent: Yes
  • Post-Emergent: Yes
  • Selective: Yes
  • Targeted Plants: Dandelion, clover, dollarweed, ground ivy, chickweed, henbit, plantain, English daisy, crabgrass, barnyard grass, fall panicum, foxtail, and annual bluegrass
  • Application Style: Broadcast spreader (sold separately)

Best Natural Weed Killer: Green Gobbler 20% Vinegar Weed and Grass Killer

Who it’s for: People who want a weed killer that’s safe for use around pets and children.
Who it isn’t for: People who want a selective weed killer that doesn’t require precise application.

Green Gobbler’s weed killer is an all-natural way to prevent weeds from growing in your yard. Its formula contains two simple ingredients: vinegar and water. But since the mixture is so concentrated, you can expect the weed killer to be about four times stronger than the table vinegar in your pantry.

This treatment works by drying out the weeds it touches, a process that typically kills them within 24 hours. This makes it an extremely effective natural weed killer. But there’s one important thing to note: The Green Gobbler weed killer will prevent all kinds of seeds from growing roots—including any seeds you intentionally planted if you accidentally spray them. (After all, vinegar doesn’t know the difference between weeds and vegetables.) This makes the application process less convenient than the selective weed killers on this list. But if your top priority is using all-natural ingredients, this is a necessary tradeoff—the product is one of the few all-natural and organic weed killers out there. And since it comes inside a tank sprayer, it should be easy to target unwanted weeds while avoiding the plants you want to keep. Plus, it’s safe to use around children and pets when used as directed, unlike most chemical weed killers.

Product Details:

  • Active Ingredients: Vinegar
  • Pre-Emergent: No
  • Post-Emergent: Yes
  • Selective: No
  • Targeted Plants: All
  • Application Style: Tank sprayer

Best Weed Killer for Lawns: BioAdvanced All-in-One Lawn Weed Killer Concentrate

Who it’s for: People who want to kill weeds on large lawns both before and after they’ve emerged.
Who it isn’t for: People who want a weed killer that’s safe to use around pets and kids.

Weeding by hand can be frustrating. But spraying individual weeds with weed killer can be just as tedious, especially if your yard is big. So when you’re working with a large space, like a lawn, a selective weed killer comes in handy. And that’s why we recommend BioAdvanced’s All-in-One Lawn Weed Killer for the job.

The weed killer is designed to kill 217 common yard weeds before and after they’ve emerged, including crabgrass. It’s a great option for killing fully grown weeds and for stopping younger weeds in their tracks. This dual approach makes the BioAdvanced weed killer a great pick for your lawn, and its easy application method makes it an even better buy. Simply attach it to your garden hose and turn the water on, then use your thumb to activate the sprayer. Since the weed killer is selective, you can spread it freely across your yard to clean up weeds without harming your lawn.

Product Details:

  • Active Ingredients: 2,4-D, dimethylamine salt, Quinclorac, and dicamba
  • Pre-Emergent: Yes
  • Post-Emergent: Yes
  • Selective: Yes
  • Targeted Plants: Dandelion, clover, thistle, chickweed, crabgrass, and more
  • Application Style: Tank sprayer

Best Weed Killer for Flower Beds: Roundup Landscape Weed Preventer

Who it’s for: People who want to protect landscaped flower beds from growing new weeds.
Who it isn’t for: People tending to lawns or vegetable gardens, or anyone who primarily needs to get rid of existing weeds.

Hoping to keep weeds out of your flower beds? Roundup’s Landscape Weed Preventer is a great first line of defense. While this product won’t get rid of existing weeds, it will kill weeds before they can grow in the first place, making your flower beds much easier to maintain in the long run.

The treatment contains pendimethalin as its active ingredient, and it acts as a “weed barrier,” so it stops common weeds from growing wherever you sprinkle it. This makes it a great pick for people who have flower beds and intricate landscaping. You can spread the treatment around your plants and flowers, and it will keep weeds at bay for up to six months. The Roundup weed preventer is another option on this list that’s selective, so it shouldn’t harm your prized flower beds or landscaping, even if you’re a little imprecise when applying it. It also has a built-in applicator, which means you can shake out the treatment directly from the bag.

Product Details:

  • Active Ingredients: Pendimethalin
  • Pre-Emergent: Yes
  • Post-Emergent: No
  • Selective: Yes
  • Targeted Plants: Clover, chickweed, crabgrass, foxtail, and more
  • Application Style: Shaker bag

Best Weed Killer for Vegetable Gardens: Preen Natural Vegetable Garden Weed Preventer

Who it’s for: People who want to stop weeds from growing around vegetables and herbs.
Who it isn’t for: People who want to kill existing weeds in their yard or garden.

When controlling weeds in a vegetable garden, you want a weed killer that’s all-natural and safe for use around food and herbs—and Preen’s Natural Weed Preventer fits the bill. This weed killer contains a single ingredient—corn gluten meal—which prevents germinating weeds from growing roots. You’ll have to be proactive though: This product stops weeds from growing in the first place, but it won’t kill any of the existing weeds in your vegetable garden.

The Preen weed preventer is another all-natural product that isn’t selective, so you have to make sure you only apply it to areas with weeds. Otherwise, you might find that the treatment stops your veggies and herbs from growing, too. But, when used correctly, the product works for up to four weeks, so you only need to apply it every month or so. And if you maintain an organic vegetable garden, it’s available in an organic version, too.

Product Details:

  • Active Ingredients: Corn gluten meal
  • Pre-Emergent: Yes
  • Post-Emergent: No
  • Selective: No
  • Targeted Plants: All
  • Application Style: Shaker

Best Weed Killer for Patios: Spectracide Weed and Grass Killer With Extended Control Concentrate

Who it’s for: People who need to kill weeds on paved areas like patios or driveways.
Who it isn’t for: People who want to target specific plants and weeds.

Fast-acting, effective, and easy to use, Spectracide’s Extended Control Weed and Grass Killer is a great option for patios, sidewalks, driveways, and other paved areas. The product relies on several active ingredients to control weeds, and it’s a very effective formula. It can kill existing weeds in as little as three hours and it can prevent new weeds from growing for up to five months. And you don’t have to worry about inclement weather right after application—if it rains more than 15 minutes after application, the precipitation won’t wash away the treatment.

Since this Spectracide weed killer isn’t selective, it should effectively knock out any plant or weed it touches. This may sound like a negative—if the product isn’t selective, you usually have to be careful where you spray it—but remember that you’re applying it on pavement. Anything growing out of your patio or driveway likely wasn’t supposed to be there in the first place. That’s why we still think using the Spectracide weed killer is an efficient way to clean up paved areas.

Product Details:

  • Active Ingredients: Diquat dibromide, fluazifop-p-butyl, dicamba, dimethylamine salt, and oxyfluorfen
  • Pre-Emergent: Yes
  • Post-Emergent: Yes
  • Selective: No
  • Targeted Plants: All
  • Application Style: Tank sprayer

Final Verdict

Capable of killing existing weeds, preventing new weeds, and fertilizing your lawn, Scotts Turf Builder Triple Action is our favorite because it’s a triple threat. We also like that the treatment is selective, so you don’t have to worry about it harming your plants or grass while it cleans up the weeds in your yard.

How to Shop for Weed Killers Like a Pro

Ingredient List

Weed killers can use a range of different ingredients—some natural, some not. If you’re curious about what’s inside a weed killer, be sure to check both its active ingredients list and its other ingredients list. We made it easy for you by listing the active ingredients for each weed killer we recommend (some common examples are dicamba, pendimethalin, vinegar, and 2,4-D). Unfortunately, most companies don’t disclose full lists of the other ingredients in their formulas, which makes it difficult to determine everything that’s in a given weed killer.

Pre-Emergent vs. Post-Emergent

Weed killers can be pre-emergent, post-emergent, or both. If a weed killer is pre-emergent, it will help you control weeds before they start to grow. (These are usually called weed preventers.) Post-emergent weed killers, on the other hand, will help you kill existing weeds in your yard. Finally, if the weed killer is pre-emergent and post-emergent, it will do both of these jobs.

Selective vs. Non-Selective

Some weed killers are selective, meaning they’re designed to kill certain weeds without harming other plants. Others are non-selective, so they’ll kill any plant they encounter. Selective weed killers are generally more convenient than non-selective weed killers: You don’t have to be super precise when applying them, and they won’t harm other vegetation such as landscape flowers or plants. But they’re also engineered, so people who want an all-natural solution should pick a non-selective weed killer instead.

If you choose to use a selective weed killer, check to see which weeds the product is designed to target. (You can usually find a list on the product label.) Make sure the formula you’re considering can help kill or prevent the specific weeds that you have in your yard. You’ll also want to confirm that it won’t kill grass on your lawn and any plants you want to keep.

Application Style

There are many different ways to apply weed killer to your lawn and garden. Some of the most popular methods include traditional spray bottles, shaker bags, tank sprayers, and broadcast spreaders.

Generally speaking, targeted options (like traditional spray bottles) are more precise but not as convenient to use. You can easily treat weeds with a spray bottle, but it may take a while to get through your entire yard. This makes weed killers with targeted application styles a great option as long as it’s a non-selective formula.

Less targeted application styles (like broadcast spreaders) make it harder to be precise, but they’re easier to use. You can cover a lot of ground quickly, but you may end up spraying everything in your yard. Because there’s a greater risk of accidentally treating flowers or plants that you want to keep, these application styles are much better when you’re using a selective weed killer.

Questions You Might Ask

How do weed killers work?

There are two different kinds of weed killers—contact weed killers and systemic weed killers—and both work by disrupting the normal growth of a plant. “When sprayed on a weed, [contact weed killers] cause the membranes of the tissues…to be disrupted and the contents of the cells to leak,” Dr. M-Curtis says. This can cause the plant to turn brown, dry out, and eventually die—but it may not kill the plant down to its roots.

Systemic weed killers work a bit differently. According to Dr. M-Curtis, systemic options enter the tissues of the targeted weed and move around until they find “active” parts. There, the weed killer “can act by inhibiting the biological process of cell division, photosynthesis, or amino acid production,” she says. This means that systemic weed killers tend to affect entire plants, killing them down to their roots.

Can you mix different weed killers together?

Every expert we spoke to cautioned against mixing different weed killers. “If you mix weed killers together incorrectly, it can cause phytotoxicity, essentially burning your grass,” Augaitis says. “You may eliminate the weeds but damage your grass and garden while doing so.”

Do weed killers go bad?

Yes, weed killers can go bad. And once they have expired, they may not be as effective as they used to be. Even though weed killers can go bad over time, the “consequences can be minimal,” says Augaitis. If you decide to use an expired weed killer, there’s no way of knowing if it will actually kill your weeds. Augaitis says the product might simply not perform well anymore, which could still leave you with unwanted plants in your yard after treatment.

Take Our Word for It

This article was written by Lindsey Lanquist, a contributing writer for Real Simple with seven years of experience writing lifestyle content. To decide which product to feature in this article, Lindsey spent hours researching the most popular weed killers and preventers and narrowed down the list by considering factors like active ingredients, application style, and targeted plants. She also spoke to three experts—plant scientist Dr. Gladys M-Curtis, lawn care expert Michael Augaitis, and horticulturist Stuart Mackenzie—to learn more about how weed killers work and what to consider before buying one.

The Best Weed and Feeds for a Beautiful Lawn

Amanda Rose Newton holds degrees in Horticulture, Biochemistry, Entomology, and soon a PhD in STEM Education. She is a board-certified entomologist and volunteers for USAIDs Farmer to Farmer program. Currently, she is a professor of Horticulture, an Education Specialist, and pest specialist.

We independently research, test, review, and recommend the best products—learn more about our process. If you buy something through our links, we may earn a commission.

Daniel Watson / Unsplash

A single product that at one application fertilizes your lawn and controls weeds helps you save time and energy when growing and maintaining a beautiful lawn. We reviewed eight varieties of these weed and feed products based on their ease of use, spreadability on your lawn, and their overall value.

Our top pick, Scotts Turf Builder Weed and Feed, stood out from the rest for its ability to extinguish the most notorious weeds, such as dandelions and clover, and its ease in fertilizing at the same time.

Here are our top picks for the best weed and feed products for a beautiful lawn.

Best Overall: Scotts Turf Builder Weed and Feed

Gets rid of hard-to-kill weeds such as dandelions and clover

Good nitrogen source

Covers the size of a basketball court

Works best with Scotts brand spreaders

See also  How Long Does It Take To Grow Feminized Weed Seeds

Not for use on warm-season grasses

Scotts is one of the oldest names in the green industry, developing dozens of innovative products each year. The Turf Builder Plus is a fan favorite due to its effective control of weeds that reseed easily such as dandelion and clover. It includes a healthy dose of nitrogen, expressed in its ratio of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (N-P-K ratio), keeping grass green and growing late into the season.

Like most weed and feeds, you apply Turf Builder Plus when rain is not in the forecast, to ensure it doesn’t wash away (but it is recommended to apply to a wet lawn). Application is a breeze: Simply follow the illustrated, easy-to-read directions on the bag, add to your spreader, and fertilize away. While Turf Builder works on an impressive number of grass types, it isn’t recommended for several warm-season southern grasses such as the ever-popular St. Augustine.

NPK Ratio: 28-0-3︱Type: Slow Release︱Application: Granular

Fertilizers rely on three major nutrients—nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (chemical symbol K) —to keep grass in weed-fighting shape. Expressed as product’s N-P-K numbers, they reflect each nutrient’s percentage by weight. So a product with an N-P-K ratio of 28-0-3 would have 28 percent nitrogen, zero percent phosphorus, and 3 percent potassium. Understanding this ratio helps you make the best choice when selecting a weed and feed to help keep your beautiful lawn looking good!

Best Budget: GreenView Weed & Feed

Vast broadleaf weed control

Not commonly found in garden centers

Slower acting than others

Greenleaf might be light on price but it goes heavy on weeds! Boasting control of over 250 broadleaf species, a 13-pound bag should be enough to cover a yard the size of a basketball court. The heavy nitrogen allows for quick green-up without the risk of burning your lawn. The zero-phosphate formula helps prevent runoff into nearby waterways, ensuring you don’t contribute to algal blooms.

The slow-release formula feeds the soil and aids in water retention to help protect from heat and drought during the summer months. Recommended for most grass types, this weed and feed only needs to be used twice a year to guarantee results.

NPK: 27-0-4︱Type: Slow Release︱Application: Granular

Best Splurge: Pennington UltraGreen Weed & Feed

Extended feeding time

Kills over 250 weed varieties

5% iron helps keep grass green

Not for St. Augustine Grass

Pennington features high-quality products and are a staple brand for golf courses and sports stadiums. The UltraGreen weed and feed claims to kill over 250 broadleaf weeds, including dollar weed, clover, and henbit. Both a quick and slow-release formula; it allows grass to green up quickly while slowing releasing nutrients over 3 months.

As with several other brands reviewed, you can use UltraGreen on just about any grass type, northern or southern, with the exception of St. Augustine. Distinctive to the formula, Pennington always offers of a shot of iron, a staple ingredient in constructing green grass. The resealable bag makes it easy to store leftovers, and the coverage size of 5,000 square feet (about the size of a basketball court) makes it useful for just about all lawn sizes.

NPK ratio: 30-0-4︱Type: Slow and quick release︱Application: Granular

Best Organic: Espoma Organic Weed Preventer

Abundant nitrogen for green-up

Easy to use, with clear directions

Works on all grass types

Doesn’t kill existing weeds

Espoma is the oldest organic company in the green industry. This product contains corn gluten meal, a natural source of nitrogen, aiding quick green-up, and which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has found to lack adverse effects on humans and animals . Application is easy with a spreader, and a 25-pound bag covers up to 1,250 square feet, a fourth of the size of a basketball court.

Applied twice a year, this weed and feed is a preventative, to stop weeds before they emerge. (If you are trying to kill weeds that are already present, this is not the weed and feed for you.) The corn gluten that prevents feeds also feeds the grass, giving it a rich green color and strong roots.

NPK Ratio: 9-0-0︱Type: Slow Release︱Application: Granular

Best Spray: Scotts Liquid Turf Builder with Plus 2 Weed Control Fertilizer

Easy and fun to apply

Goes to work quickly

Large coverage area

Cannot use on St. Augustine Grass

Requires a hose to apply

Scotts Turf Builder comes in a handy liquid form. Great for those with small spaces, you can easily fertilize and control weeds with a single spray. The bottle features a hose attachment, which allows you to cover about a basketball-court-size area from 4,000 square feet (cool-season grasses) to 6,000 square feet (warm-season lawns). It’s fun, too!

Controlling post-emergent weeds including ivy, knotweed, clover, and dandelions, you can use this multiple times a year with just about every grass type. (Once again, owners of St. Augustine Lawns are out of luck.) The spray allows for easy uptake of needed nutrition and serves as a healthy vitamin boost for your grass.

NPK Ratio: 25-0-2︱Type: Quick Release︱Application: Liquid

Best for St. Augustine Grass: Fertilome St. Augustine Weed & Feed

Safe for St Augustine and other warm-season grasses

Offers preventative and post-emergent control

Only covers 2,500 square feet

Not usable on Bermuda grass

Southern homeowners love St. Augustine grass for its hearty ability to stand up to intense heat and high traffic. However, many major weed and feed brands explicitly instruct not to use their products on the Southern classic. Florida brand Fertilome offers a St. Augustine-exclusive blend that serves as both a preventative and post-emergent weed-destroying superhero. In fact, the manufacturer specifies to use this product only on St. Augustine, Zoysia, Centipede, and carpet grass lawns.

You need to apply this product only once, in early spring, and the slow-release formula continues to feed the rest of the season. This product only covers up to 2,500 square feet (half a basketball court), half the coverage offered by the other brands tested.

NPK Ratio: 15-0-4︱Type: Slow Release︱Application: Granular

Best Weed Preventive: Preen One LawnCare Weed & Feed

Kills up to 250 types of weeds

Covers 5,000 square feet

Not for use on St. Augustine grass

For a post-emergent weed world, Preen One is our top choice for banishing them quickly. It also works as a pre-emergent, making sure developing seeds from existing weeds do not make their appearance again next season. Controlling over 250 weeds, including clover and dandelions, it also feeds your lawn for up to 2 months. The manufacturer also claims the product kills other common lawn weeds, including dandelions, chickweed, thistle and clover, and prevents crabgrass and its cousins from coming back.

As a feeder, the product contains slow-release nitrogen for steady nutrition. Homeowners living near waterways can feel confident of using this zero-phosphate formula without worrying about runoff. While this product is not to be used on Southern grasses, such as St. Augustine and colonial bentgrass, it can be used for other, common warm-season grasses such as Bermuda and Zoysiagrass, You can purchase Preen One in three sizes: 9-, 18-, and 36-pound bags, which can cover areas from half a basketball court to just under an Olympic swimming pool.

NPK Ratio: 24-0-6︱Type: Slow︱Application: Granular

Best for Cool Season: GreenView Fairway Formula Spring Fertilizer Weed & Feed with Crabgrass Preventer

Kills over 200 types of weeds

Has both quick and slow release nutrients

Covers 15,000 square feet

Should not be used on new lawns

Crabgrass is the bane of many homeowners because it disrupts a lawn’s smooth texture. Most prevalent in cooler-season grasses, it can be near impossible to get rid of once it settles in. This product’s slow-and-quick- release formula knocks out crabgrass, as well as 200 other weeds; the manufacturer claims its proprietary formula kills dandelions and seedling crabgrass at the same time. As a feeder, its nutrients slowly release over a 3-month period, providing lasting nutrition for established lawns.

The spring lawn-care product is a pre-emergent, meaning it is designed to prevent crabgrass and other undesirables from growing. However, it is not meant for use on freshly planted lawns, as it is likely to burn new growth. Also, this product is not available for sale in Alaska, Hawaii, and California. And, it was hard to track down due to issues with shipping it to certain states, so bear that in mind as you plan your search.

NPK Ratio: 24-0-6︱Type: Quick and Slow Release︱Application: Granular

Scotts Turf Builder is our pick for Best Overall Weed and Feed. Not only does it suppress 250 species, but it is also easy to use, and works on just about every grass type. For a product that busts weeds but not your budget, we recommend GreenView Weed & Feed for its heavy nitrogen content, allowing for quick green-up.

What to Look for in a Weed and Feed

Before buying any fertilizer product, keep in mind these important considerations to make sure you buy the best to suit your grass type, climate, and timeline.

N-P-K Ratio

All fertilizers, including those with added herbicide, rely on the three big nutrient needs to keep grass in weed fighting shape. Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium are generally listed front and center on any fertilizer bag you pick up, with the percentages of package weight listed clearly. Understanding what each one does helps you make the best choice when selecting a week and feed to help keep your plants healthy while enlisting a weed suppressant for assistance.

  • Nitrogen, listed first, is the most important for overall growth. It promotes healthy leaf development and is responsible for the bright green we love to see in lawns. A shot of nitrogen helps take away the stress endured from competing with weed species.
  • Phosphorous, the second listed number, is responsible for developing healthy roots. Most lawns tend to be deficient in phosphorus, and grass is not a notorious heavy phosphorous feeder. Fertilizers containing phosphorus are not permitted for lawns near waterways or in a county with a fertilizer ban during the rainy season. Phosphorus deficiency shows up as reduced vigorous or slowed growth ; a quick soil test can let you know if your lawn is phosphorus deficient.
  • Potassium, also known as potash, helps roots dive deeper into the soil, allowing grass to increasingly resist stressors such as heat, drought, and weeds. While nitrogen allows for quick growth, it is necessary to encourage those roots to stretch out and not become reliant on a quick fix from a heavy nitrogen source. It also gives weeds less space to take over.

Application Type

Fertilizers and weed and feeds are sold in slow-release and quick-release formats. Liquid weed and feeds are always quick-release, meaning they are water-soluble; plants can take them in a short time, generally within a month. Non-soluble slow-release weed and feeds are sold in a granular, polymer-coated format. As the product breaks down, it slowly releases nutrients, which the plant can take up as needed. This also allows for fewer applications, as slow-release products can take 3 months to fully break down. This also helps prevent the likelihood of burning plants through too much nitrogen fed too quickly. Many weed and feed products mix both slow and quick release, working quickly on weed suppression while slowly feeding the plant. This helps increase the overall rigor, which decreases the likelihood of opportunistic weeds from elbowing in.

Grass Type

The United States is divided into many gardening zones, based on climate. Grass suited to North Dakota likely cannot handle the intense heat of Florida summers. To keep it simple, grass is defined as cool-season Northern (like Kentucky bluegrass) or Southern (like St. Augustine). Identifying turf grass can be challenging but it is essential for making sure you select an. appropriate weed and feed. If not, the herbicide component may kill turf grass. Manufacturers must list the types of grass best suited to each product, so be sure to consult first before you use.

If you believe your lawn comprises multiple types of turf grass, always err on the side of caution and select based on cool- or warm-season grasses.

The basic premise of a weed and feed is to include a herbicide and nutrition in one shot. When lawns are healthy, weeds have less opportunity to outperform your grass. Generally, the herbicide is 2, 4-D or Dicamba, which are in amounts designed to target weeds but not the surrounding grass.

Pre-emergent weed and feeds concentrate on getting weeds before they appear. Most noxious weeds produce numerous seeds, which pre-emergents help make sure never make it to adulthood. Consider a post-emergent when weeds are already problematic.

For best results, apply a weed and feed at the start of growing season, when grass is no longer dormant and weeds are getting ready to pop. Depending on where you reside, that could be late March or early April. Weed control is all about strategy, and timing is at the heart of it. Plan on fertilizing and using a pre-emergent in early spring, and follow up later with a post-emergent, as needed.

For most fertilizers and weed and feeds, wait at least 48 hours before watering. This window leaves enough time for the herbicide to make its way into the weeds, leaving less residue to potentially wash off. Pre-emergent weed and feeds are less finicky, allowing you to get away with 24 hours. If possible, try to time your application so rain doesn’t spoil weed-preventative plans.

Be sure not to overwater! This can cause the herbicide to wash away along with all the nutrition you just added.

Why Trust the Spruce?

This article was written by Amanda Rose Newton, a freelance writer and Garden Reviewer for The Spruce. As an entomologist and certified horticulture professional, she delights in personally testing out the products (and manages to convince a few Northern friends to test a few, too).

To make this list, Amanda Rose used each product on equal-size swatches of lawn, following manufacturer instructions. At the end of a 3-week period, she noted grass color, weed presence, and vigor. She also factored additional measures, such as cost and ease of use, into her decisions.

The Spruce uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.