1 Month Old Weed Plant From Seed

Taking cannabis from seed to sesh connected me to the plant in ways I hadn’t expected. Being a cannabis consumer growing your own weed can be one of the most rewarding aspects. It is vital that you know and understand that when it comes to First time marijuana grower? Who can grow their own? With passage of Proposition 64, anyone in California over 21 years old can have up to six plants. If you’re a medical marijuana patient

Growing my first pot plant was easy — until it was time to smoke it

For almost as long as I’ve known about the cannabis plant, I’ve wanted to grow my own weed. This is partly because I like everything about it; not just the psychoactive effect of combusting and inhaling it, but also the way it looks, from the slender serrated fan leaves to the densely packed flowers shimmering with a crystal-like dusting (called trichomes, these tiny, hair-like structures are home to the high-producing compound THC). I like the skunky smell of a live plant, and I appreciate the fact that it’s only the female of the genus that will get you high.

But the desire to get my grow on also has a lot to do with how I grew up in rural Vermont.

When I was a kid, my family had a small farm (so small that it hardly qualified as a farm by Vermont standards) that started with a cow and grew to include a pig, chickens and a flock of sheep that grazed the field beyond our vegetable garden. Only the milk cow, Star, who had come into our family as my brother’s 4-H project, was ever named. We’d been taught from an early age that the rest of the hoofed and clawed creatures around us were livestock (as opposed to pets) and cautioned against forming an emotional bond.

In addition to having a hand in bringing eggs, bacon, chicken and milk to the table, my siblings and I saw how wool becomes yarn. We learned how to make rhubarb wine (the first kid down the stairs in the morning usually gave the crock full of fermenting fruit a good stir), how to bake bread on a wood stove (the Dutch oven came in clutch) and how to turn the sap from the trees around us into maple syrup. In short, we were doing farm-to-table before farm-to-table was even a thing, and it gave me a keen appreciation of the effort that goes into things that I otherwise would have taken for granted.

That’s why, when faced with midpandemic boredom, in a state where it’s legal to grow (under California law, anyone 21 and older can grow up to six plants for recreational use) and with an unused everything-but-the-seeds kit from A Pot for Pot (purchased while researching The Times’ 2020 holiday cannabis gift guide) lurking in the corner of my home office, I decided to connect with my roots by trying to get a pot plant to put down the same. By following the process from start to finish, I reasoned, I’d be able to better appreciate how those dried little nuggets of instant staycation get from the soil to the dispensary shelf.

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That wasn’t the only connection I was hoping for. I saw becoming an L.A. pot-plant parent as a way to gain entree to an invisible social network in this city in the way those who raise children here end up forming lifelong bonds with strangers who happen to have had kids at the same time. Instead of bonding over hastily arranged carpool schedules or sitting on the sidelines at a soccer game together, I imagined mingling with first-time marijuana moms and dope dads in the gardening supply aisle at Lowe’s, sharing baby pictures of our leafy green chlorophyll kids and trading curing tips and yield-boosting hacks.

I knew these folks would be out there, somewhere, just as I was, hopping on the quarantine gardening train for some of the same reasons — and no doubt some different ones. Some would be planting their own pot to do an end run around corporate cannabis (which, with each passing day, looks more and more like Big Pharma and Big Tobacco). Others would pursue pot parenthood to save money (buying weed in L.A. — legally — includes taxes that increase the cost of THC-containing products by more than a third) or to stick a green thumb squarely in the eye of Johnny Law as a kind of cosmically satisfying payback for decades of cannabis prohibition. (Growing your own is legal in the Golden State, but it remains illegal under federal law.)

I planted my first seed on Oct. 19, 2020, opting for an easy-to-grow strain called Lowryder. Considered one of the first autoflowering strains of marijuana — meaning the plant flowers after a set period of time instead of taking its cue from seasonal light changes — Lowryder is a cross of Cannabis ruderalis, ‘Northern Lights No. 2′ and ‘William’s Wonder’ that yields a compact, indica-heavy plant. Based on the grow guide included in my kit, my plant would be ready to harvest just before Christmas. In a nod to the holiday season timetable, when the first green sprout popped out of the soil a few days later, I nicknamed her Mariah in honor of the chanteuse whose 1994 album “Merry Christmas” seems to flower like clockwork year after year.

The first seedling, Mariah, at 8 weeks old. Her diminutive stature was most likely caused by a late transplant to a larger pot.

Fast-forward two months and, instead of the towering THC-laced tannenbaum I was hoping for, I was headed into Christmas week with a seedling — all of 5 inches tall — curving out of its pot at a 45-degree angle. Since A Pot for Pot purchases include growing consults via email, I sent off a few photos and a plea for help. A few days later, I heard back from an upbeat consultant named Taylor who wrote: “Thanks for reaching out! What a cute little plant!” Then came the bad news: Based on the photos I’d sent and the timetable I’d described, Mariah wasn’t going to get much bigger. Taylor’s theory was that I had probably waited too long to transplant Mariah from her seedling cup to her 5-gallon fabric pot, unintentionally creating bonsai bud in the process. But the silver lining, as Taylor pointed out, was that because of her stunted size, there would be more than enough nutrients in the soil mix to support a second attempt in that same pot.

So after a few weeks of mourning, I decided to give pot-plant parenting a second try. And this time around, I was determined to spare no expense — potential tax savings be damned. I invested in a bathroom scale so I could weigh the plant between waterings, and when Taylor offhandedly suggested an LED grow light so I could raise my little green girl indoors, I immediately ordered one and cleared a spot in my garage, not far from where my hard-partying friends used to routinely smoke plants like her in the pre-pandemic days.

If you’re wondering why on God’s green earth anyone blessed with the SoCal sunlight would choose to grow a cannabis plant indoors — and shell out money for a light to do it to boot — it’s worth a slight detour here to give you the straight dope on growing your own dope in the state of California (and, by extension, Los Angeles, because the city doesn’t have its own regulations addressing personal cultivation).

Unlike becoming the parent of a human, there’s a minimum age requirement — you have to be 21 — to legally become the parent of a recreational-use pot plant (different regulations apply to medical marijuana). And that six-plant limit? That’s per private residence — not resident — which means you can’t legally grow a dozen plants just because you split the rent with a roommate. Which brings me to another wrinkle that factors heavily into who does and doesn’t get to become a pot-plant parent in this fair city. Although not impossible, it’s far easier if you own the place in which you’re living and growing a pot plant. Even if your landlord doesn’t explicitly forbid the on-premises cultivation of cannabis (which he or she legally can), your lease agreement probably won’t cover the sort of modifications you might make to the property in your pursuit of off-the-grid ganja.

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And there’s one last tiny hitch in the homegrown giddyap — and one that’s of particular importance in a city like L.A. where most of us live cheek by jowl: any plants you’re growing must be in a locked space that is not visible to the public.

Taken altogether that means your ability to become a legal pot-plant parent in L.A. — despite what your biological (or botanical) clock is telling you — hinges on who owns your house, how big your yard is and how much money you’re willing to spend on grow kits (like the 5-gallon, $99.95 one I was using), LED lights ($169.95) and feminized cannabis seeds ($89 for five Lowryder Autoflower seeds).

In mid-January, I planted my second seed. When she burst forth from the soil Jan. 19, the split seed casing clinging to the top of the green shoot reminded me of an armored helmet. Having just watched “Wonder Woman 1984,” I impulsively decided this powerful woman would bear the name of the Amazonian superhero’s secret identity: Diana Prince. Eager to avoid my earlier mistake, Diana Prince was transplanted to her forever home just five days later and then locked safely in my garage under the new grow light (20 hours on, 4 hours off). I visited my baby daily, watering her just enough to keep her healthy and thriving.

Times senior features writer and first-time pot-plant parent Adam Tschorn with his dope daughter Diana Prince.

By late March, Diana Prince was stretching skyward and entering her flowering stage. Two months later, she was nearly as tall as me and appeared ready to harvest. Gun-shy from my earlier experience, I sought one last consult. (“Just going off your timeline, she is definitely ready,” replied Taylor — punctuating the sentence with a green emoji heart.)

On May 8, I hacked the branches from the stalk and felt a sharp pang of sadness. After that came a flurry of activities that included drying the branches upside down (using coat hangers, binder clips and a rolling clothes rack), then trimming the buds and finally curing them in an airtight container. (Final yield at this point: 26 grams — just short of an ounce.) According to Taylor’s email, it’s this last part — the curing — that brings out flavor, eliminates the chlorophyll and makes for a smoother smoke. The recommendation was to cure the herb two to eight weeks. Taylor noted that some folks prefer the go-slow approach and will cure their bud for up to six months.

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In early July, the curing phase of Operation Ganja Green Thumb hit Week 8. From the beginning of this botanical adventure, this was the moment I’d been thinking about and waiting for, with visions of sticky bud dancing in my head. Now was the time to literally taste the fruits of my labor, to consume something I’d planted and watched grow to maturity. This was the culmination of my very first seed-to-sesh journey, a chance to bring the lessons of my growing-up years and my enthusiasm for cannabis full circle all at once. The time had finally arrived, and, even without fear of legal retribution, I found myself reticent to pack a pipe or roll a joint and take a taste of my own medicine.

As the eighth week stretched into the ninth, I dutifully burped the curing jar every few days, gazing at the contents with awe before snapping the lid back in place and putting the container away, but I didn’t try it. Was I, on some subconscious level, afraid that I wouldn’t get high enough (or, even worse, not high at all) off my homegrown handiwork? Perhaps the thrill had really been about the process — the pursuit of happiness — the whole time and not about the ounce of weed curing in my pantry. Or maybe I wanted the best for my baby and was dragging my feet only until Diana Prince had cured a full six months?

Then it hit me: In my haste to marry the nostalgic farm-to-table experiences of my Vermont childhood to my love of weed, I’d forgotten the part about not forming an emotional bond and had done exactly that. Even worse, I’d given her a name and imagined a personality for her. By naming her Diana Prince, I’d become less of an urban herb farmer about to get his buzz on and more like the Titan Kronos of Greek mythology about to swallow his offspring.

The fix was easy enough. Brandishing my P-Touch label maker, I printed out “Lowryder strain, seed two” and stuck the label on the container of curing buds, right over top of the one that read “Diana Prince.” I instantly felt better.

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Senior features writer Adam Tschorn writes about a range of style-centric pop-culture topics for the Los Angeles Times. Holding a B.A. in philosophy and an M.A. in journalism makes him well-qualified to look at something and ask: “Why?”

Average Grow Period for Sativa , Indica , and Hybrid Strains of Cannabis

Being a cannabis consumer growing your own weed can be one of the most rewarding aspects. It is vital that you know and understand that when it comes to growing all strains aren’t created equal.

Sativa, Indica, and hybrid strains all grow differently and have varying degrees of time it takes to flower. Are you aware of the different growing periods for each? It is important to know the average grow period and differences of growing each strain.

The Life Cycle of Cannabis Plants

Once your seeds have been sown and your cannabis plant has become a little baby seedling. After that; it will experience two major stages of life; known as the vegetative stage (when plants are growing) and the flowering stage (where plants are producing buds).

The Seedling stage:

Can last anywhere from 3-6 weeks.

The Vegetative Stage

This is where your plant begins to grow, and grow, producing those big jagged leaves cannabis is famous for.

Did you know a healthy pot plant can grow up to 2 inches in one day if you did everything right. Whether sativa, indica, or hybrid, this is the time when the roots of your cannabis plant continue to expand, and your plant continues to grow larger.

The length of time a plant is in the vegetative stage is completely dependent on its exposure to light. Growing cannabis indoors, means you can manipulate your light cycle, essentially keeping plants in the vegetative state as long as you want. To keep a plant in vegetative without flowering, it

Should receive under 18 hours of light and 6 hours of darkness. The longer your plants stay in a vegetative state, the bigger your plants will get, so you will need space.

Flowering Stage

The flowering stage of cannabis is when your plants start to produce the flowers that will eventually become the buds you harvest. It’s also the stage of a cannabis plant occurs after light exposure’s reduced. Where cannabis plants will stay in veg forever if they’re kept under light for 18 hours a day, switching the light cycle to 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness will initiate the flowering stage.

The average cannabis flower time is 6-10 weeks and sometimes longer. The length of time plants are in flower depends on the type of cannabis you’re growing as well as the conditions you’re growing in.

The normal grow period for Sativa , Indica , and Hybrid :

Sativa Flowering Time to Fully Grown Plant

Sativa strains of cannabis usually grow: long, tall, and lanky. Secondly; sativa stem is from regions near the equator, where the length of the day rarely changes regardless of what time of year it happens to be. Equal days and equal nights have led sativa strains to grow in short, consistent photoperiods. This simply means that the height of a sativa plant increases during both vegetative and flower periods.

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Pure sativa strains can grow to heights of 20 feet due to growing so tall, indoor growers generally stick to indica strains instead. Sativa typically has a shorter vegetative cycle, but once the plant begins to flower it can take up to 10-12 weeks until it is ready for harvest. A pure sativa strain take 16 weeks to finish in flower.

The growing period for pure sativa strains is around six months.

Indica Flowering Time to Fully Grown Plant

Popular choice for many experienced growers. Indica strains grow short and fat and typically yield more than their tall, lanky sativa counterparts. They are also known to have shorter flowering periods than sativas. Because indicas have a shorter flower period, indoor growers can have more annual cycles. The flowering period for indica strains is typically around 8 weeks. If you’re growing indica, you can expect your plants to be in flower for 8-12 weeks.

Hybrid Flowering Time to Fully Grown Plant

Hybrids are a blend of sativa and indica cannabis strains. Also, hybrid cannabis strains are a blend of both indica and sativa, when cultivated they typically take on traits of one or the other. Much like sativa strains, hybrid strains can grow quickly during the vegetative stage. When it comes time to flower however, they may take on the shorter flower periods common to pure indica strains. Typically, hybrid strains will stay in flower for 6-10 weeks until ready for harvest.

By growing indoors, you manipulate your environment a bit more. Overall, the average growing period for all types of cannabis, sativa, indica, and hybrids included is around 3-6 months depending on the environment you’re growing in. To stay updated on the Medical Marijuana Cannabis laws and regulations check out the DHSS website.

First time marijuana grower?

Who can grow their own?
With passage of Proposition 64, anyone in California over 21 years old can have up to six plants. If you’re a medical marijuana patient with a doctor’s recommendation, you can have as many as you and your doctor decide you need.

That said, all non-commercial cultivation for recreational use (called “adult use” in California) and medical use is subject to local regulations. Many cities and counties require permits even for personal use and many ban outdoor growing entirely, requiring you to grow indoors under lights. Check your locality’s rules.

While we can sell plants to you and you can legally drive them home, you may be subject to restrictions on how and where you grow them.

Where can I grow my plants?
The best place is outdoors in sunshine and fresh air, where plants are happiest. Plant them in the spring or summer and harvest in the fall. However, if you don’t have access to garden space or your local jurisdiction doesn’t allow outdoor cannabis growing, you can grow them indoors under high-powered “grow” lights. Check with your local city or county officials to see if there are specific limits on where you can grow.

Growing any plants indoors under artificial lighting, but especially cannabis, requires some research, skill and practice. There are many books and websites dedicated to it.

We recommend outdoor growing in the normal gardening season, so most of what follows is somewhat specific to outdoor cannabis gardening.

First, some basics about cannabis plants.
Cannabis is a “genus”, a taxonomic unit used by biologists to classify living organisms, that contains several species: Cannabis indica, Cannabis sativa and Cannabis ruderalis. These interbreed freely, resulting in “hybrid” species that contain features of both parent species. (Note that Cannabis nomenclature is changing. Stay tuned.)

Cannabis has been the subject of such intensive breeding that there are virtually no “pure” sativa or indica strains. Virtually all are hybridized.

Boys and girls
Cannabis is also “dioecious”, which means male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. This may seem weird, but it is quite common in the plant world. Pistachios, date palms, stinging nettles and Gingko trees all have male and female flowers on separate plants. Just as only female pistachio trees produce nuts, only female cannabis plants produce the useful flower clusters commonly called “buds”. Male flowers are tiny and fall off once they’ve bloomed and shed their pollen.

The process of identifying which plants are male and which are female is known as “sexing”. It is an important part of cannabis cultivation that takes an experienced eye. At the nursery, we take the guesswork out of it and guarantee that our plants are all female.

While you can grow both male and female plants together, you will end up with low-quality “bud” that is packed full of seeds. By excluding the males, the female flowers will never be pollinated, allowing the clusters to grow bigger and more potent. Male plants, once identified at the nursery, are composted.

Seed-grown or clone?
Plant Humboldt is one of the very few cannabis nurseries to offer female plants grown from seed. This is the original Humboldt grow-your-own tradition. Many cannabis farmers—old-timers and first-timers, medical users and commercial growers—still prefer seed-grown starts.

Others prefer starting from rooted cuttings, known in the industry as “clones”. Clone plants start as small branches cut from a “mother plant” and rooted in trays indoors in a controlled climate under artificial lights.

There are advantages and disadvantages to both seed-grown and clone-grown starts. Seed-grown plants tend to be more vigorous, but can sometimes show variation in their production, and they need to be sexed properly to exclude males (something we take care of at the nursery). Clones, being genetically identical to the mother plant, will produce bud with consistent look, smell and potency, but are often less vigorous plants and have specific light requirements that can be tricky for beginning growers (see below). Clones are only cut from known female plants, so all clones are female from the start.

Along with seed-grown plants, we sell clones in 4” pots that are well-rooted and acclimated to natural light and air, so they are ready to plant in your garden straight from the nursery.

Night and Day
Cannabis is an annual plant and has two seasonal growth phases: vegetative and flowering. During spring and summer (“veg” phase), the plant puts on extensive leaf and stem growth, often in massive amounts.

As the days get shorter and nights get longer in late summer (August in the Northern Hemisphere), the plants are triggered into flowering phase (“budding”). If you’re an outdoor grower, you will typically plant in the spring and harvest in the fall, whether you’re starting your plants from seed or clone.

But, with clones there’s a catch. Clones are cut off of a mother plant that is kept indoors under artificial light for 18 hours or more per day, so the mother plant and the little cutting “think” they’re living in an endless summer of long days and therefore remain in vegetative phase. If you put that rooted cutting outside in the spring under natural daylight, when the days are short, it thinks it’s fall and time to flower. A seedling, on the other hand, will wait till the light naturally fades again in the fall to go into flower.

At the nursery, we add a few hours of supplemental light with low-wattage LEDs in order to trick the clones into thinking it’s endless summer and therefore keep them in vegetative phase. After about June 1st, you can plant a clone in your garden and it will grow normally, with no extra light needed. Before June 1st, you will need to add supplemental lighting for a few hours each evening (or early morning) or the plant will go immediately into flower and you’ll end up with a tiny plant with one little bud on it. Supplemental lighting can be as little as a single low-wattage bulb on a timer next to the plant. You don’t need expensive horticultural grow lights because all you’re doing is tricking the plant a little.

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Cultivation Basics
Cannabis is as easy to grow in your garden as a tomato plant, but there are some rules of thumb that will dramatically improve your yield and quality.

Soil
We recommend all first time growers use commercial potting soil, not native garden soil. Master gardeners can grow cannabis successfully in natural dirt, but beginners will have much better results with bagged soil.

Container
The bigger the roots, the bigger the plant. You can dig a large hole and fill it with commercial potting soil or use a plastic pot or fabric grow-bag above ground. The bigger, the better. Many Humboldt commercial cannabis farmers use 200 gallon (or bigger) fabric grow bags, but these are expensive and require a lot of expensive soil to fill. For a personal-use amount of finished marijuana, a 20-gallon pot will be manageable and can be put on a patio or deck. In the ground, dig a hole at least 30” across and 18” deep and fill it with commercial potting soil.

Fertilizer
You can spend $100 on a bottle of plant fertilizer with a fancy label, but there’s no need to. Any organic fertilizer will do. Some commercial potting mixes, especially those formulated for cannabis, have significant amounts of plant nutrients included. In vegetative phase, cannabis likes more nitrogen (marketed as “grow” formula fertilizers). Once your plants switch to flowering phase they need lower nitrogen but more phosphorus and potassium (“bloom” formula).

Spacing
When provided proper care and large root space, outdoor, seed-grown plants can easily grow to be eight feet tall and equally broad. In some cases they can grow twice that size, all in one short season. Even for a beginning gardener, a well-cared for cannabis plant in a 20-gallon pot can still get four feet tall by equally wide, so plan your space accordingly.

Trellising/staking
Modern cannabis strains have been bred for heavy flower (“bud”) production, often to the point where the branches will break under the weight if not supported. As the branches grow out, gently tying them to thin bamboo stakes with plant tie wire (available at garden stores) will keep them from breaking off later during flowering phase.

Pest Control
Cannabis is relatively pest-free, but there are a few that can ruin your entire crop, particularly mites and molds. Detailed pest control descriptions are available online, in books and through cannabis-centered grow shops. Below is a quick overview of what to look for. We recommend getting a 100x pocket microscope and checking your plants regularly, especially the undersides of the leaves where mites live. These are available at most grow shops for about $20.

Mites
Spider mites and russet mites can destroy your plants and buds. Spider mites leave white “stippling” spots where they suck the juice from the leaves. Large infestations will build up webs on the plants. (Learn to distinguish from the webs of actual spiders, which are beneficial!) Spider mites are barely visible to the naked eye, but easy to identify with a pocket microscope. There are many available organic treatments.

Russet mites are microscopic, but visible with a 100x pocket microscope. The reason they are so feared among growers is that by the time damage becomes visible, the crop is often irrecoverable. That is why it’s important to do preventative pest control and maintain constant vigilance. Don’t wait till your plants look sick! Russet mites look like tiny milky colored maggots with four legs in front. They are much harder to spot at first and, unlike spider mites, are literally microscopic and can only be seen with a 100x pocket microscope. Growers are still struggling with organic control methods. Natural insecticides based on essential oils, neem and yeast enzymes all seem to work to varying degrees. Check with your local grow shop. We recommend doing routine preventative control even if you don’t see russet mites with your microscope. The good news is that anything you do to control russets will also control spider mites, thrips, fungus gnats and most other cannabis pests.

Detailed pest control is beyond the scope of this page, but you’ll need a small hand-pump sprayer and some organic pesticide. Any good grow shop can advise you. You don’t need to spend a ton of money to do basic preventative control. At the nursery, we use various organic pest control sprays preventatively about twice/week, but most home growers won’t need near that often of a spray schedule. If you are diligent with your microscope inspections, you may not need to do much at all if you don’t see any mites.

Fungi
Powdery mildew, also known as “powder mold” or “PM”, is a fungus that grows as a white powdery coating on the leaves and buds. In small amounts it will not hurt the plant, but you don’t want to be smoking it if it gets on the flowers near harvest. It is easy to control with dilute hydrogen peroxide, potassium bicarbonate, bacterial anti-fungal solutions (e.g. Actinovate, Serenade) and many other off-the-shelf and DIY concoctions. Look online, in books or ask at a grow shop for detailed information.

Brown/gray mold, also called “bud mold” or “stem mold” is a systemic fungus that rots buds from the inside out. The best way to prevent it is to keep the plants from getting rained on during flowering phase and to provide extensive dry airflow. Once mold is identified in a bud, remove and discard the infested part and harvest the adjacent bud to limit the spread.

Harvest and storage
The rule of thumb is that when most of the pistils (commonly known as “hairs” for their appearance) on the flower clusters (“buds”) have turned from white to brown, it is time to harvest. If possible, have an experienced friend take a look and give you harvest advice, or check online.

To harvest, cut the branches, remove all the large leaves by hand or with a scissors and hang the branches in a cool, dry place with plenty of airflow but minimal heat. There is an art to proper curing and it takes some experience to get it right. The main mistakes are drying too fast with too much heat, which causes the buds to crumble, and drying too slowly, which can cause mold. A cool, dry (not damp and moldy!) basement with a small fan blowing on a string full of branches is ideal unless you want to invest in specialized climate control equipment like commercial growers do.

The proper dryness is when the buds are dry, but not crispy to the touch. A good rule of thumb is to bend the stems below the flowers. If the stems snap but don’t break clean through, the flowers are probably about the right dryness. If the stems merely bend, let the cannabis dry some more. If the stems snap clean through into separate pieces, the flowers are probably too dry. If needed, they can be placed in a slightly more humid environment briefly to rehydrate so they don’t crumble when handled.

Once the proper dryness is reached, clip the buds off the stems and store in a cool, dry place. Glass jars in a closet are perfect. Be sure to check the moisture levels regularly to avoid mold.

For updates on when your favorite strains are ready, sales, cultivation tips and more, sign up to our email list .


Note: we would like to add links to competent online how-to resources for first-time growers (there is A LOT of BS out there!). If you have suggestions, please let us know via email to [email protected]
Happy growing!

2022 COVID-19 update. We take the pandemic seriously and ask that you take precautions while visiting and traveling. All nursery staff are vaccinated and the nursery is open-air, so there is a very low risk of transmission. To be on the safe side, we ask that you maintain a minimum of 6′ or greater distance from employees and other customers and be aware that many of our customers use cannabis for medical reasons and may be more vulnerable to infection from any virus. If you want to wear a mask but don’t have one, we have paper ones we can give you. If you’re more comfortable around nursery staff with masks, we can put one on when serving you.
More info here.